1. David Johnson (Ari, 25)

Talent Overview: On his college film, Johnson was a very unique prospect. Despite his massive frame (6’1”, 224 pounds), Johnson didn’t play like a big back. Instead, he was used in a ton of different ways: taking standard carries, running from out of the shotgun, fly sweeps, splitting out wide, going in motion, etc. It was evident very early when watching Johnson that he was a space player with the frame of a power back. Well, that has changed in the pros, as he has shown much better instincts as an interior runner than we thought he had. While no one will call him a pure “power” guy, he’s big enough to absorb hits — at Northern Iowa, he handled over 1000 career touches, a ridiculous number. Simply put, the man is a matchup nightmare. He’s a very talented route runner capable of easily shaking off linebackers and leaving himself wide open out of the backfield. Once he gets to the open field, he can use his exceptional speed and agility to elude tackles. He’s also a very willing blocker. Coming out of Northern Iowa, we thought he was a talented player who would make an impact as a rotational back. Well, it’s apparent Johnson is now much more than that. He’s perhaps the most versatile back in the entire league.

2016 Season/Stats Review: DJ is good. That’s really all there is to it. Something will have to go hideously wrong in 2017 if he isn’t the #1 overall pick for fantasy in basically any format. In 16 games, he posted 293/1239/16 rushing (4.2 YPC) and 80/879/4 receiving on 118 targets (11 YPR, 67.8% catch rate) to finish with 25.7 FPG. He finished the season ranked #2 behind Le’Veon Bell, but keep in mind DJ was averaging 27 FPG before Week 17, which he left after just 8 touches due to a knee injury (which looked more serious than it actually was). He finished as a top-12 RB a staggering 14 times and was the top overall RB six times. In games DJ started and finished, he had no fewer than 101 yards from scrimmage. He scored multiple TDs in eight games, and went scoreless in only six. And again, aside from the injury-shortened Week 17, he had 100 yards from scrimmage in every game, so even if he didn’t score a TD, he came through for you. Despite his consistent 100-yard dominance, DJ didn’t have a single game with 200 yards from scrimmage. That’s seriously the worst thing we can say about his incredible season. DJ played 83.8% of Arizona’s offensive snaps including his brief Week 17 appearance. Johnson’s biggest regret from the year according to Twitter was that he fell short of a 1000-yard rushing and 1000-yard receiving season. Let’s see if he ca...