Whether your league awards bonuses for distance scoring or not, it’s definitely worth noting which players score longer TDs. The NFL is all about making plays, and longer plays (of course) mean more points. On the flip side, some players who scored a lot of longer TDs could be due for a serious TD regression next season. In many cases, longer plays can be flukes, but there are many noticeable trends.

Given that, we’ve analyzed all the key players from 2016 and have broken down the length of their TDs by distance for your review. For QBs, we stuck just to passing TDs, while other skill positions include both rushing and receiving TDs.

 

Quarterbacks

Rank

Player

Team

0-9

10-19

20-29

30-39

40+

Total

1

Aaron Rodgers

GB

24

7

6

2

1

40

2

Matt Ryan

Atl

17

6

4

5

6

38

3

Drew Brees

NO

22

6

2

2

5

37

4

Phillip Rivers

LAC

15

7

3

1

7

33

5

Andrew Luck

Ind

15

5

5

3

3

31

6

Ben Roethlisberger

Pit

12

1

11

4

1

29

7

Tom Brady

NE

13

7

1

2

5

28

8

Jameis Winston

TB

11

8

4

2

3

28

9

Derek Carr

Oak

13

6

2

4

3

28

10

Marcus Mariota

Ten

14

4

2

5

1

26

11

Carson Palmer

Ari

17

2

2

2

3

26

12

Eli Manning

NYG

10

7

3

3

3

26

13

Kirk Cousins

Was

8

6

3

2

6

25

14

Matthew Stafford

Det

12

5

3

2

2

24

15

Blake Bortles

Jac

10

8

3

0

2

23

16

Dak Prescott

Dal

9

5

6

1

2

23

17

Russell Wilson

Sea

9

6

1

2

3

21

18

Joe Flacco

Bal

9

5

1

1

4

20

19

Sam Bradford

Min

10

4

4

1

1

20

20

Cam Newton

Car

7

4

1

2

5

19

21

Ryan Tannehill

Mia

5

6

3

1

4

19

22

Andy Dalton

Cin

9

4

1

0

4

18

23

Trevor Siemian

Den

8

2

1

2

5

18

24

Tyrod Taylor

Buf

7

4

0

2

4

17

25

Colin Kaepernick

SF

5

8

0

0

3

16

26

Carson Wentz

Phi

9

3

1

1

2

16

27

Alex Smith

KC

7

4

0

2

2

15

28

Brock Osweiler

Cle

7

4

3

0

1

15

29

Ryan Fitzpatrick

NYJ

5

5

2

0

0

12

30

Case Keenum

Min

2

3

1

0

3

9

31

Matt Barkley

SF

5

1

1

1

0

8

32

Josh McCown

Cle

2

2

1

1

0

6

33

Brian Hoyer

SF

4

1

1

0

0

6

34

Cody Kessler

Cle

3

2

1

0

0

6

35

Blaine Gabbert

SF

2

0

1

1

1

5

36

Jared Goff

LAR

3

1

1

0

0

5

37

Jay Cutler

Chi

0

3

0

0

1

4

38

Jimmy Garoppolo

NE

0

2

1

1

0

4

 

Aaron Rodgers (GB, 40) – Rodgers has been given plenty of weapons over his career and weathered the ups and downs of the 2016 season beautifully, leading the NFL with 40 TDs and taking advantage of Jordy Nelson’s return to full health. And during a down year for Randall Cobb, one of Rodgers’ more reliable weapons over the years, we saw the consistent emergence of Davante Adams, who was a solid short-intermediate threat and helped Rodgers to 24 TDs of 0-9 yards. The 2017 list of weapons looks the same for Rodgers, with the addition of Martellus Bennett. Expect much of the same out of Rodgers in the coming season.

Matt Ryan (Atl, 38) – We know it’s unlikely that Matt Ryan duplicate’s numbers from what was a career year. However, we do know that he has a bevvy of weapons at his disposal, from the Devonta Freeman-Tevin Coleman backfield tandem, to the legendary Julio Jones, to the big play Taylor Gabriel. It’s why his TD distribution was spread out magnificently in 2016, throwing 17 TDs inside the 10 and 11 TDs from 30+ yards out. He has all his weapons back for 2017, and HC Dan Quinn said the offense won’t change under new HC Steve Sarkisian, so we won’t be surprised to see Ryan back towards the top of this list next year.

While Brandin Cooks is gone, Brees still has plenty to work with. Expect this age-less vet to continue his TD roll.Drew Brees (NO, 37) – Brees continues to roll on, now at age 38. He has a new No. 1 receiver in Michael Thomas, and despite the departure of Brandin Cooks, the acquisition of Ted Ginn still gives him a speedster on the outside. Thomas provides an excellent red-zone threat, hence the 22 TDs of 0-9 yards, and while we can’t overstate Cooks’ departure, WR Willie Snead is also capable of making big plays. Brees should continue to chuck it around the yard constantly, and considering there’s more firepower in the passing game than the running game, we’d expect Brees to be towards the top of this list again next year.

Philip Rivers (LAC, 33) – Even without his top weapon, Keenan Allen, on the receiving end yet again due to injury, Rivers still makes it towards the top of the D count, thanks to the emergence of Tyrell Williams and the red-zone hog TE Hunter Henry. Rivers had 22 TD passes inside the red-zone but also 7 TD passes of 40+ yards, which led all QBs in the NFL. We know he’s getting up there on age, and it was refreshing to see RB Melvin Gordon to take a big step forward, but with a healthy Allen (and Travis Benjamin for that matter), Rivers has weapons in all facets. He won’t have Danny Woodhead anymore as a passing-back, but Rivers should continue to put up big TD numbers, thanks to the youth outside.

Andrew Luck (Ind, 31) – Luck bounced back nicely from a lost 2015 season that saw him play just 7 games due to injury. He did continue to take hits in 2017 and had shoulder surgery following the regular season, but he should be fine. His 31 TD passes were the second-highest of his career, and he accomplished that while working with mainly only one reliable WR and some inconsistent TE play at times. The team added Kamar Aiken at WR in the offseason, and it looks like Jack Doyle is the number 1 TE right now, so as long as WR Donte Moncrief (who was Luck’s favorite red-zone target) can stay healthy, Luck should again be towards the top of this list. Oh, and he has this guy named TY Hilton at his disposal as well.

Ben Roethlisberger (Pit, 29) – Big Ben had an excellent short passing game option in Le’Veon Bell and one of the best WRs for intermediate-deep routes in Antonio Brown, but the absence of Martavis Bryant was very noticeable, as vertical-threat Sammie Coates couldn’t stay healthy and suffered from a case of the drops throughout the season. Bryant will be back for 2017, so you gotta love Ben’s chances with AB, Bryant, Bell and slot receiver Eli Rogers. Ben had just one TD pass of 40+ yards, but plenty in the intermediate game, thanks to AB. Big Ben is getting up there in age (35), and he actually had to announce that he’s returning for 2017, but he has arguably 2 of the best players in the NFL at his disposal, so look for plenty of TDs yet again.

Tom Brady (NE, 28) – Brady finishes towards the top of the list even after missing the first four games of 2016 due to suspension and being without his man Gronk for a good portion of the season. He had 7 TDs of 30+ yards, thanks to some nice work from Chris Hogan and rookie Malcolm Mitchell, and 20 TDs inside the red-zone. And now he gets Brandin Cooks as well. Cooks’ arrival will bump some others down the depth charts, but the fact that Brady has Cooks, Gronk and Julian Edelman is just ridiculous…not to mention the talented receiving backs he has as well. With a full 16 games, he should easily surpass 30 passing TDs.

Jameis Winston (TB, 28) – Winston is another QB who now seems to have ideal threats at every level. He has top-5 and big bodied WR Mike Evans, red-zone target Cameron Brate, and now deep-threat DeSean Jackson. Considering the question marks surrounding the Bucs running game, we expect Winston to sling it around a ton in 2017. He increased his 2015 TD total by 5 in 2016, and we expect another step forward in 2017, so look for him to break the 30-TD threshold.

Derek Carr (Oak, 28) – As long as Carr can stay healthy coming off of a broken leg, he should be in for another big year. He has two 1,000-yard receivers at his disposal, the team signed TE Jared Cook in the offseason, and with Latavius Murray gone, some of those goal-line and red-zone plays might turn into pass plays (all of Murray’s TDs came inside the 10). Carr was effective from all distances in 2016, throwing 19 TDs inside the red-zone with 3 TDs of 40+ yards. He has the talent around him to take another step forward and reach 30 TDs, he just needs to recover, and stay healthy.

Marcus Mariota (Ten, 26) – Mariota went down late in 2016 with a broken fibula, but prior to the season-ending injury, he was incredibly efficient, throwing 18 red-zone TD passes and adding 6 TD passes of 30+ yards, even with fairly little to work with outside. He still doesn’t have the greatest weapons and the Titans will likely again employ a run-first offensive philosophy with DeMarco Murray, but Mariota remains a very desirable fantasy asset. It was also encouraging to see he and WR Rishard Matthews consistently click down the stretch.

Carson Palmer (Ari, 26) – Palmer’s 2016 was a step back from his 2015, but he still has Larry Fitzgerald and David Johnson in the passing game, and WR JJ Nelson became a pleasant mid-season surprise as well. The majority of Palmer’s TDs came in close quarters, primarily due to the fact that John Brown was battling illness and injury for most of 2016. If Brown can return healthy, it’ll be an extra dimension for Palmer, who should still have a solid chance of cracking 30 passing TDs in what could be his final NFL season.

Eli Manning (NYG, 26) – Manning took quite the step back in 2016, going from 35 TDs in 2015 to just 26 in 2016, the majority of which went to Odell Beckham. Manning now gets Brandon Marshall as an added weapon, so he has plenty of pieces to utilize. If anything, we can pencil Manning in for another 25+ TDs between those two guys alone, but we’d like to see Manning regain some of his 2014-2015 form.

Kirk Cousins (Was, 25) – Cousins’ TD distribution was one of the most even among all NFL QBs, throwing 14 TDs inside the red-zone and 11 TDs outside the red-zone, including 6 TDs of 40+ yards, thanks to DeSean Jackson. D-Jax is gone now, though, as is Pierre Garcon. However, the team added vertical-threat Brian Quick and former Brown WR Terrelle Pryor in the offseason, so Cousins still has a full arsenal to work with. We saw him develop some excellent chemistry with Jamison Crowder as well, but it wasn’t consistently sustained. Hopefully, an improved running game can help out this passing game, and we’re expecting to see Josh Doctson crack fantasy relevance.

Matthew Stafford (Det, 24) – The yards were again there for Stafford, who has now passed for 4,000+ yards in six consecutive seasons. However, the TDs weren’t there. A drop-off was to be expected, considering the retirement of Calvin Johnson. Former Bengal Marvin Jones didn’t live up to expectations, and RB Theo Riddick, one of the best receiving backs in the league, couldn’t stay healthy. Luckily, Golden Tate emerged as Staff’s favorite target down the stretch, so expect the two to pick up where they left off. We’ll see if someone can step up in the vertical game, as Stafford had just 2 TDs of 40+ yards.

Blake Bortles (Jac, 23) – Bortles’ TD count should be lower, but that’s why garbage-time is something you just can’t ever forget about. Bortles showed significant regression in 2016, despite having the same weapons on the outside. 18 of his 23 TDs came inside the red-zone, with just 2 TDs coming from beyond 30 yards out. We still think Allen Robinson is a stud, and he’s clearly Bortles’ favorite target, but we’re not expecting much of Bortles in 2017, especially since red-zone threat TE Julius Thomas is gone. You probably shouldn’t either.

Dak and Dallas are officially synonymous now, but this is still a Zeke-first offense.Dak Prescott (Dal, 23) – Dak likely won’t ever be a TD machine, considering he has one of the league’s best backs behind him, but he still has Dez Bryant at his disposal and we like what we saw from the Prescott-Beasley connection at times. It looks like every time Dallas gets close to score, they just give the rock to Ezekiel Elliott, as Dak had just 14 TDs inside the red-zone. He has great fantasy value, but his TD numbers will be consistently capped because of how good Zeke and the O-line is.

Russell Wilson (Sea, 21) – An abysmal offensive line performance put Wilson under duress far too often, clearly impacting his numbers and setting him back from a 34-TD 2015 season. He was also hampered by injury and had an inconsistent run game. We can absolutely see Wilson bouncing back in 2017, despite not fully knowing how to feel about Eddie Lacy. Wilson still has Doug Baldwin and Jimmy Graham, and a healthy Tyler Lockett means big play ability (though we can’t necessarily count on Lockett like we can Baldwin and Graham). Expect Wilson to approach 30 passing TDs in 2017.

Joe Flacco (Bal, 20) – Flacco had 4 different receivers in 2016 that seemingly had 4 different specialties, as he was able to hook up with Mike Wallace on deep plays (Flacco had 4 TDs of 40+ yards), trust Breshad Perriman on contested catches, and work with vet Steve Smith in the intermediate game. Smith and Kamar Aiken are both gone, leaving Wallace and Perriman as the top 2 options. Flacco no doubt has to play better, but could also use a more consistent run game to help him out. He’s never been a guy to throw for 30 TDs in a season (his high was 27 TDs in 2014), so temper expectations.

Sam Bradford (Min, 20) – Bradford performed well on such short notice, being traded from Philly to fill in for the injured Teddy Bridgewater in Minnesota, and it didn’t take long to establish a connection with WR Stefon Diggs who, unfortunately, just couldn’t stay healthy. 14 of Bradford’s TDs came inside the red-zone and he didn’t have much of a deep-threat, but we hope Laquon Treadwell can take a step forward this year. Between Treadwell, Diggs, Adam Thielen, and TE Kyle Rudolph, Bradford should reach 20 TDs again, but it’s just not currently a very fantasy friendly offense all around.

Cam Newton (Car, 19) – Newton’s 2016 season was one to forget, as he had the worst TD:INT ratio of his career and threw for the third fewest yards of his career…not to mention a career worst 359 yards rushing. It looks like his days of being a 500-yard rusher are through, which is good news for the passing game. However, his primary wideouts, Kelvin Benjamin and Devin Funchess, didn’t give us too many encouraging signs in 2016 (to be fair, Benjamin was coming off a torn ACL). Additionally, while Newton did throw for 5 TDs of 40+ yards, his deep-threat, Ted Ginn, is gone. HC Ron Rivera said Cam’s confidence was shook, and rightfully so—he was sacked 36 times and took a beating when he took off and ran. He’s an excellent bounce back candidate and should reach 20 TDs passing, but don’t expect a duplicate of 2015.

The Dolphins finally have a consistent run game, so Tannehill's TD numbers may not skyrocket, but he still has nice weapons around him.Ryan Tannehill (Mia, 19) – We’re gonna continue to give Tannehill love, considering we liked how he looked under Adam Gase in year 1 before going down with injury and considering the team re-signed Kenny Stills. Tannehill missed the last four games of the season with a partially torn ACL but it didn’t require surgery and he’s apparently well on his way to a full recovery. There’s a chance he becomes more of a pocket passer in 2017, which would spell good news for his TD total, and we love the acquisition of red-zone threat TE Julius Thomas, as Tannehill had just 11 TDs inside the red-zone and 5 inside the 10-yard-line. It’s looking like he’s not going to be a consistent 30-TD guy, but he has all the weapons, so he could certainly approach it this season.

Andy Dalton (Cin, 18) – What happens when AJ Green and Tyler Eifert can’t stay healthy? Andy Dalton’s fantasy value takes a major hit. That’s exactly what happened in 2016, as Dalton regressed from 25 passing TDs to just 18, with just 13 TDs inside the red-zone. It was an entirely new look, considering Giovani Bernard couldn’t stay healthy either, and Mohamed Sanu and Marvin Jones had departed. Much should change in 2017, though, with Green and Eifert healthy and another year in the system for WR Brandon LaFell. Expect Dalton to get back towards 25 passing TDs.

Trevor Siemian (Den, 18) – It was shocking that Siemian won the starting QB job at the start of 2016, but it could be a hot competition with Paxton Lynch during training camp. Siemian had two of the league’s best receivers at his disposal but couldn’t consistently string together solid performances. He did have 5 TDs of 40+ yards, thanks to Emmanuel Sanders, but only 10 TDs inside the red-zone. The TE play was practically non-existent as well. Assuming Siemian is the starter in 2017, we’ll likely see some similar numbers.

Tyrod Taylor (Buf, 17) – Taylor had nearly as many TDs of 30+ yards (6) as he did TDs inside the 10 (7), thanks to his deep ball. One of his vertical targets though, Marquise Goodwin, is gone. We’d think Taylor’s passing TD total would have been a bit higher if Sammy Watkins stayed healthy, but Taylor isn’t a pocket passer nor is he a guy whose fantasy value is in passing TDs. While Taylor may again be a borderline QB1/QB2, don’t expect more than 20-25 passing TDs at best.

Colin Kaepernick (SF, 16) – Things are ugly for Kap. In 12 games, he managed to throw just 12 TD passes, 13 of them coming inside the red-zone. As of now, he’s not a starter anywhere, so there’s not too much to discuss.

Carson Wentz (Phi, 16) – After looking like an all-star through the first couple games, Wentz experienced some typical rookie growing pains in 2016. Granted, he had garbage to work with. 12 of his 16 TDs came inside the red-zone but he put his gun on display plenty of times. Now, he has Alshon Jeffery and Torrey Smith to work with. He may not 30 passing TDs in 2017, but there really is no doubt that he’ll take a step forward statistically this year.

Alex Smith (KC, 15) – Not to sound like a broken record but, this was fairly expected, considering how the KC offense operates. What was unexpected, however, was Smith throwing 4 TDs of 30+ yards, including 2 of 40+ yards, thanks to Tyreek Hill. Now, more than ever, with the emergence of Hill and the dominance of Travis Kelce, can Smith increase his numbers statistically, but don’t expect him to reach 25 passing TDs in 2017. For the record, his career-high is 23 in 2013.

Brock Osweiler (Cle, 15) – It’s amazing the Texans made it to the playoffs considering the play by Osweiler. He may have been even more disappointing than Blake Bortles, especially considering the amount of money he was paid. He’s in Cleveland now, but the team is apparently planning to trade or release him, so he’s no lock to be a starter in 2017.

Ryan Fitzpatrick (NYJ, 12) – Now a free agent, 10 of Fitz’s 12 passing TDs in 2016 came inside the 10, as the passing game was just absolutely abysmal. He should find a backup job somewhere, but has no fantasy value.

Case Keenum (Min, 9) – Keenum threw more interceptions than he did TDs in 2016 (11 INTs to 9 TDs) and now finds himself in Minnesota as the backup to Sam Bradford. There’s no fantasy value here.

Cody Kessler (Cle, 6) – We wouldn’t be surprised if the Browns still gave Kessler a chance to start in 2017. He was far from stellar in 2016, but was fairly efficient, throwing 6 TDs and just 2 INTs. He will no longer have Terrelle Pryor, however. Instead, he’ll be working with Kenny Britt and Corey Coleman, and RB Isaiah Crowell will likely get the rock more than Kessler will throw. We would expect TE Gary Barnidge to bounce back from an abysmal 2015 season and be a contributor in what should be a mediocre passing game. There’s a lot of uncertainties here still, but there are definitely worse QBs out there than Kessler.

Jared Goff (LAR, 5) – Goff didn’t look ready at all for the NFL last season, throwing just 5 TDs in 8 games, 4 of which came in the red-zone. We were witness to what could be when Goff connected with Tavon Austin for an intermediate-length TD, but we’re done hoping that Austin turns into a fantasy stud. What we do like, however, is the addition of WR Robert Woods, who should turn into Goff’s number 1 target in the passing game. Do we think Goff is going to turn into a consistent fantasy starter in 2017? Probably not. But another year under his belt can’t hurt.

Notable players not included due to lack of starts: Blaine Gabbert, Matt Barkley, Jay Cutler, Jimmy Garoppolo, Josh McCown, Brian Hoyer

 

Running Backs

Rank

Player

Team

0-9

10-19

20-29

30-39

40+

Total

1

David Johnson

Ari

16

1

2

0

1

20

2

LeGarrette Blount

NE

15

1

0

0

2

18

3

Ezekiel Elliott

Dal

9

3

0

1

3

16

4

LeSean McCoy

Buf

9

3

1

0

1

14

5

Devonta Freeman

Atl

9

2

0

1

1

13

6

Latavius Murray

Min

11

0

1

0

0

12

7

Melvin Gordon

LAC

11

1

0

0

0

12

8

DeMarco Murray

Ten

10

1

0

0

1

12

9

Tevin Coleman

Atl

7

1

0

2

1

11

10

Mark Ingram

NO

6

2

1

0

1

10

11

Jeremy Hill

Cin

7

1

0

0

1

9

12

Jonathan Stewart

Car

9

0

0

0

0

9

13

Ryan Mathews

Phi

9

0

0

0

0

9

14

Mike Gillislee

Buf

7

1

0

0

1

9

15

Le'Veon Bell

Pit

9

0

0

0

0

9

16

Carlos Hyde

SF

6

3

0

0

0

9

17

Jay Ajayi

Mia

5

1

1

0

1

8

18

Matt Forte

NYJ

5

2

0

1

0

8

19

Christine Michael

GB

6

0

0

0

2

8

20

Robert Turbin

Ind

8

0

0

0

0

8

21

Frank Gore

Ind

6

2

0

0

0

8

22

Isaiah Crowell

Cle

6

0

0

0

1

7

23

Jordan Howard

Chi

6

0

1

0

0

7

24

Rob Kelley

Was

5

1

1

0

0

7

25

Todd Gurley

LAR

5

0

1

0

0

6

26

Matt Asiata

Min

6

0

0

0

0

6

27

Lamar Miller

Hou

5

1

0

0

0

6

28

Terrance West

Bal

5

1

0

0

0

6

29

DeAngelo Williams

Pit

4

2

0

0

0

6

30

Shaun Draughn

NYG

4

2

0

0

0

6

31

Damien Williams

Mia

3

3

0

0

0

6

32

Theo Riddick

Det

3

2

1

0

0

6

33

Derrick Henry

Ten

4

1

0

0

0

5

34

C.J. Anderson

Den

4

0

1

0

0

5

35

Devontae Booker

Den

3

1

0

0

1

5

36

Tim Hightower

SF

4

0

0

0

1

5

37

John Kuhn

NO

5

0

0

0

0

5

38

Spencer Ware

KC

4

0

0

0

1

5

39

Bilal Powell

NYJ

3

1

0

0

1

5

40

Chris Thompson

Was

3

1

1

0

0

5

41

James White

NE

2

2

1

0

0

5

42

Zach Zenner

Det

4

0

0

0

0

4

43

Jeremy Langford

Chi

4

0

0

0

0

4

44

Rashad Jennings

NYG

3

1

0

0

0

4

45

Darren Sproles

Phi

2

0

1

0

1

4

46

Jerick McKinnon

Min

2

2

0

0

0

4

47

Travaris Cadet

SF

2

2

0

0

0

4

48

Matt Jones

Was

2

1

0

0

0

3

49

Doug Martin

TB

3

0

0

0

0

3

50

Ty Montgomery

GB

3

0

0

0

0

3

51

Chris Ivory

Jac

3

0

0

0

0

3

52

Thomas Rawls

Sea

2

0

0

0

1

3

53

Giovani Bernard

Cin

2

0

1

0

0

3

54

Kenneth Dixon

Bal

2

1

0

0

0

3

55

Jamize Olawale

Oak

2

0

0

0

1

3

56

Aaron Ripkowski

GB

3

0

0

0

0

3

57

Jalen Richard

Oak

1

1

0

0

1

3

58

Charcandrick West

KC

3

0

0

0

0

3

59

Cameron Artis-Payne

Car

1

1

0

0

0

2

60

Jacquizz Rodgers

TB

2

0

0

0

0

2

61

DeAndre Washington

Oak

0

0

2

0

0

2

62

Rex Burkhead

NE

2

0

0

0

0

2

63

Orleans Darkwa

NYG

2

0

0

0

0

2

64

Kerwynn Williams

Ari

1

0

0

0

1

2

65

Alfred Morris

Dal

2

0

0

0

0

2

66

Kenyan Drake

Mia

1

0

0

0

1

2

67

Kenjon Barner

Phi

2

0

0

0

0

2

68

Charles Sims

TB

1

0

1

0

0

2

69

T.J. Yeldon

Jac

1

1

0

0

0

2

70

Corey Grant

Jac

0

1

0

0

1

2

71

James Starks

GB

0

1

0

1

0

2

72

Terrell Watson

Phi

1

0

0

0

0

1

73

C.J. Prosise

Sea

0

0

0

0

1

1

74

Duke Johnson

Cle

1

0

0

0

0

1

75

Shane Vereen

NYG

1

0

0

0

0

1

76

Justin Forsett

Den

1

0

0

0

0

1

77

Alfred Blue

Hou

0

0

1

0

0

1

78

Jamaal Charles

KC

1

0

0

0

0

1

79

Kyle Juszczyk

Bal

0

1

0

0

0

1

80

Dwayne Washington

Det

1

0

0

0

0

1

81

Chris Johnson

Ari

1

0

0

0

0

1

82

Alex Collins

Sea

1

0

0

0

0

1

83

Wendell Smallwood

Phi

1

0

0

0

0

1

84

Lance Dunbar

Dal

1

0

0

0

0

1

85

Peyton Barber

TB

0

0

0

0

1

1

86

Mike Davis

SF

1

0

0

0

0

1

87

Andy Janovich

Den

0

0

1

0

0

1

88

Reggie Bush

Det

1

0

0

0

0

1

89

Mack Brown

Was

0

0

0

0

1

1

90

Jonathan Williams

Buf

1

0

0

0

0

1

91

Juwan Thompson

Den

1

0

0

0

0

1

92

George Atkinson

Cle

1

0

0

0

0

1

93

Danny Woodhead

Bal

1

0

0

0

0

1

94

Ameer Abdullah

Det

0

1

0

0

0

1

95

DuJuan Harris

SF

0

0

0

0

1

1

96

C.J. Spiller

KC

1

0

0

0

0

1

97

Kapri Bibbs

Den

0

0

0

0

1

1

98

Mike Tolbert

Buf

1

0

0

0

0

1

99

Alan Cross

TB

1

0

0

0

0

1

100

Patrick DiMarco

Buf

1

0

0

0

0

1

 

Johnson will likely be the number 1 fantasy pick in 2017 for many reasons...one of which is his propensity for scoring non-stop.David Johnson (Ari, 20) – Johnson followed up a remarkable 2015 with a legendary 2016, leading all RBs with 20 combined TDs. He rarely found paydirt from long distances, but based on sheer volume, finding the endzone over and over again was inevitable, either seeing carries or targets from inside the 10 and leading all RBs with 16 TDs inside the 10. Carson Palmer will still have Larry Fitzgerald, John Brown and JJ Nelson as weapons, but DJ’s role in the passing game makes him a near shoe-in to be towards the top of this list again in 2017. We did see wear and tear take a toll on him late in the season and wouldn’t be surprised if he sees fewer touches, but Johnson basically is the Arizona offense, and is capable of scoring anywhere on the field.

LeGarrette Blount (NE, 18) – Blount was the NE plodder and drive-finisher, as evident by his 15 TDs from inside the 10. Additionally, 16 of his 18 TDs came from inside the red-zone. While he did surprisingly had 2 lengthy TDs during 2016, Blount did what was asked of him to absolute perfection, commanding touches in short-yardage situations. It’s still a fairly hairy situation in the NE backfield, especially with the addition of Rex Burkhead, so if the Pats do re-sign Blount, he’ll again have to be at the top of his game. But while he is absolutely one dimensional, Blount should still see the majority of the touches inside the red-zone and especially at the goal-line.

Ezekiel Elliott (Dal, 16) – The rookie phenom Elliott proved capable of both pounding the rock near the goal-line and also breaking tackles at the line of scrimmage from all over the field. 4 of his 16 TDs were from 30+ yards, including a game-sealer against the Steelers, in which he basically burst right through the middle untouched. Dallas’ offensive lines are one of the best, so we have to expect Elliott’s sophomore campaign to be along the lines of his rookie one. Additionally, he’s far and away their best back, no one is coming close to challenging him, and based on sheer volume, his TD numbers should again be around this area.

LeSean McCoy (Buf, 14) – After tallying just 6 rushing TDs in 2015, he totaled 14 between rushing and receiving, as he was the only consistent part of the Bills offense. He dealt with a few dings in 2016 and suffered a high-ankle sprain in Week 17, but will be all systems go for 2017. The Bills tended to favor Mike Gillislee near the goal-line late in the year, while Shady’s east-west movements were chain-movers. Still, he’s the number 1 back in Buffalo so while the Bills might ease his workload just a tad to keep him fresh, he’ll have a great chance of hitting double-digit scores yet again.

Devonta Freeman (Atl, 13) – With a healthy Tevin Coleman for most of the season, the two-headed Atlanta backfield attack was lethal, led by Freeman, who followed up an extraordinary 2015 with yet another stellar season in 2016. Coleman was more involved as a receiver, and Freeman didn’t have the snapshare that he did in 2015, but Freeman finished off drives consistently, often getting the rock near the goal-line. 9 of his 13 TDs came from inside the 10-yard-line. He’s only 25 and it’s tough to see Matt Ryan replicate his passing performance from 2016, so look for Freeman to continue to dominate and find the end-zone plenty.

Latavius Murray (Min, 11) – Murray was extremely TD-dependent for fantasy value yet again in 2016, as the plodder finished off plenty of drives for the Raiders, but showed lackluster running ability. In fact, 11 of his 12 TDs came from inside the 10. He’s now in Minnesota, where he’ll likely be the lead back but still concede some carries to Jerick McKinnon. We do like Murray to again see plenty of goal-line touches and easy TD opportunities, but as you know…we’re just not that high on him in general.

Melvin Gordon (LAC, 12) – After a grand total of 0 TDs in Gordon’s rookie season in 2015, he became the true workhorse in 2016 after Danny Woodhead was lost for the season with injury. Gordon did end up on IR at the end of the season, and he still has room for improvement, but he can at least be locked in for nearly all goal-line work, especially since Woodhead is now in Baltimore. All 12 of Gordon’s TDs came from inside the red-zone. Philip Rivers will have plenty of weapons in the passing game once Keenan Allen and Travis Benjamin return to health, so it’s possible Gordon sees a little less work, but he’s still one of the top options based on volume and situation.

DeMarco Murray (Ten, 12) – So much for all the talk about Derrick Henry eating into Murray’s workload. We never thought it would happen so we’re gonna toot our own horn a bit. Murray was a workhorse in every sense, finishing off drives and moving the chains. 11 of his 12 TDs came from inside the red-zone, as Marcus Mariota didn’t have too much to work with in the passing game. We did think Henry fared well when he was on the field, so his workload is sure to rise a bit, but HC Mike Mularkey has explicitly stated that Murray is the workhorse, and he should be back in the double-digit TD count again in 2017.

Tevin Coleman (Atl, 11) – Coleman did get bit by the injury bug yet again in 2016, but it was not nearly as bad, as he missed just 3 games. Between Coleman and Devonta Freeman, the two totaled an astounding 24 TDs. He’s the number 2 back, but valuable in the passing game and performs best when kept fresh. Coleman did have 3 TDs of 30+ yards, showcasing his athleticism and proving he’s capable of scoring anywhere, so while we wouldn’t be shocked if his TD count decreased a bit, he’s still a good bet to score on any play.

Mark Ingram (NO, 10) – Ingram hit 1,000 yards rushing for the first time in his career and it came surprisingly in a bit of an RBBC. 8 of his 10 TDs came from inside the red-zone and there were plenty of ups and downs during his 2016 campaign, but we feel optimistic about Ingram’s chances to again tally a high TD count in 2017. This offense is more explosive through the air than it is on the ground, but Ingram is still just 27 and the most talented back in this backfield. At the very least, he should see plenty of chances to punch it in from inside the 10.

Jeremy Hill (Cin, 9) – While Hill may be high on this list, he’s not high on our list, and he’s not high on the Bengals’ list either, as it’s expected the team will draft a RB. He most certainly benefitted from Giovani Bernard’s season ending injury, but Hill’s 9 TDs can’t distract us from the fact that he’s simply a shell of his rookie self.

Jonathan Stewart (Car, 9) – Though he’s entering his age-30 season and it’s likely the Panthers will draft a running back, Stewart should still get the first crack at the starting job. All 9 of Stewart’s 2016 TDs came from inside the 10, though he did pile up yards elsewhere. Frankly, drafting a back and easing up on Stewart’s workload could keep him fresh and help him tally up a decent amount of TDs again.

Ryan Mathews (Phi, 9) – All 9 of Mathews TDs came from inside the 10-yard-line, as he wasn’t one to break open field tackles or elude tackles and explode for big plays…that was Darren Sproles’ job. Mathews was a bit of a frustrating fantasy asset in 2016, but amid injury and the RBBC of he, Sproles, Wendell Smallwood and Kenjon Barner, Mathews remained the lead back for most of the season. It remains to be seen what the Eagles will do in the draft, or if he even remains an Eagle, but he’ll be 30 in October with a litany of injuries, so lower expectations.

Mike Gillislee (Buf, 9) – Gillislee turned into the goal-line back late in the season and filled in admirably for LeSean McCoy when he was injured, but it’s tough to confidently say Gillislee can repeat his 9-TD performance barring another injury to Shady. He’s one of the best handcuffs to have for fantasy, and he did break loose for a long TD once, but his ceiling is limited by the presence of McCoy.

You're drafting Bell if you can, right? Right.Le’Veon Bell (Pit, 9) – It took until Week 10 for Bell to find paydirt in 2016, which makes his 9 TD total all that more remarkable, as he practically couldn’t stay out of the end-zone in the second half of the season. He’s their workhorse, their number 2 option in the passing game, and is capable of scoring from all over—though all 9 of his TDs did come from inside the 10-yard line. We can’t say enough about his patience and vision in between the tackles. Look for him to easily reach double-digit TDs in a full 16 games in 2017.

Carlos Hyde (SF, 9) – Hyde has had some serious injury issues in his career, so it wouldn’t be surprising if the Niners add some depth to keep him fresh. All Hyde’s 9 TDs came inside the red-zone and he was pretty much the only reliable part of the Niners offense. We’ll see what happens now that Kyle Shanahan has taken over, but we still like Hyde as the lead back, he’s only 25, and while the QB situation is a bit more positive now than last season, Hyde should remain a focal point of this offense and have plenty of chances to score.

Jay Ajayi (Mia, 8) – Make no mistake, this is an Ajayi-first offense. Yes, Ryan Tannehill has weapons on the outside in Jarvis Landry, Kenny Stills, and DeVante Parker; and yes, the addition of Julius Thomas might call for more pass plays inside the red-zone, but Ajayi proved in 2016 that the offense operates around him, scoring 6 TDs inside the red-zone, another one from 20 yards out and another one from 40+ yards away. Ajayi ran into some loaded boxes which hampered him at times, but he has just as good a chance as any to hit double-digit TDs in 2017.

Matt Forte (NYJ, 8) – Bilal Powell took over once Forte got injured late last season, and handled the role nicely, but it remains to be seen if Powell can sustain a full workload over the course of an entire season. Meanwhile, Forte looked dynamite early on in 2016. We’d think they temper his workload in 2017, as the wear-and-tear took its toll, but he should still open the season as the number 1 back and get plenty of carries near the goal-line, as 7 of his 8 TDs came from inside the red-zone in 2016.

Christine Michael (GB, 8) – We don’t love Christine Michael, but with Eddie Lacy gone, Michael should have a real shot to get carries alongside Ty Montgomery. Michael was on fire at the start of the season with the Seahawks, and his TD breakdown shows he’s capable of scoring form anywhere (6 TDs inside the 10, 2 TDs from 40+ yards), but it’s also clear he can’t handle a full workload and needs to be kept fresh in order to perform optimally and have a shot to hit 6, 7 or 8 TDs.

Robert Turbin (Ind, 8) – Turbin is a TD vulture in every sense, as all 8 of his TDs came from inside the 10-yard. He’ll again be Frank Gore’s backup, which will severely limit his carries, but we can at least count on him to see the rock plenty once the Colts get near the goal-line. 8 TDs might be tough to duplicate, but he’ll sure get his chances.

Frank Gore (Ind, 8) – Gore unfortunately gave way to Robert Turbin inside the 10-yard line plenty of times, otherwise his TD tally would surely be in the double-digits. Still, Gore scored all 8 of his TDs inside the red-zone. We’re not sure how effective Gore can remain, as he’ll be 34 at the start of the 2017 season and has taken a bruising the last few years. It’s likely the team drafts a running back, so temper your expectations for this aging vet.

Isaiah Crowell (Cle, 7) – The lackluster Browns offense didn’t have much going for it in 2016 and it remains to be seen if it’ll be any better in 2017, but at least one thing is clear: Crowell should enter the season as the lead back ahead of Duke Johnson. Crowell broke off a long TD but mainly punched the ball in from close distances, as 6 of his 7 TDs came from inside the 10. Johnson will still likely be more involved in the passing game, but Crowell will get enough volume to reach a respectable TD total.

John Fox will likely employ a run-first offense centered around Jordan Howard. Translation? He's gonna score a lot.Jordan Howard (Chi, 7) – Howard emerged as the clear leader in the Chicago backfield in Week 4, and while he did have some down games, the volume was consistently there, and will be again in 2017. This Bear offense will be centered around Jordan Howard, who has an excellent shot of getting double-digit TDs this coming season. He was the beneficiary of seeing the rock consistently near the goal-line, especially during a bad-weather game in which he scored 3 TDs against the Niners from inside the 10. Howard may not be the explosive player who breaks off a 40-yard TD, but he’s the guy who will see the rock time and time again once the offense gets into the red-zone.

Rob Kelley (Was, 7) – Kelley was more serviceable replacing Matt Jones as the starter in Washington, but he’s not the long-term answer at RB for the Redskins. He’s not an explosive player but saw enough volume to tally 7 TDs in 2016, 6 of which came from inside the red-zone. With all the weapons Kirk Cousins has on the outside, Kelley won’t be the centerpiece of this offense, but he should at least see carries inside the 10, barring an early RB draft pick by Washington.

Todd Gurley (LAR, 6) – After tallying 10 TDs in his rookie season in 2015, 2016 was a major step back for Gurley, who never reached 100 yards rushing and scored 5 of his 6 TDs from short-yardage situations. Gurley has an excellent chance to rebound in 2016, as he’s simply too talented and too explosive, but if the offensive line doesn’t improve and if he continues to see loaded boxes, it could be a rough going for him. It’s safe to say we’re cautiously optimistic of his chances to increase his TD total in 2017.

Matt Asiata (Min, 6) – Asiata likely won’t be back in Minnesota since the team signed Latavius Murray. Asiata was pretty much a non-factor alongside Jerick McKinnon, and only scored from inside the 10-yard line. He’ll be purely a complementary back wherever he lands.

Lamar Miller (Hou, 6) – It’s almost a definite that Miller’s usage will be monitored closely at the start of 2017, as he wore down over the course of the season. Miller actually didn’t find paydirt until Week 6, and defenses had a fairly easy time stacking boxes considering the struggles of former Texan QB Brock Osweiler. However, Miller is the clear starter and workhorse back in Houston and should have a great shot of increasing his TD total.

Terrance West (Bal, 6) – West enters 2017 as the lead back in Baltimore almost by default, considering the suspension to Kenneth Dixon. However, new arrival Danny Woodhead will get almost all the passing down work, and West certainly didn’t do anything in 2016 to give us confidence in him.

DeAngelo Williams (Pit, 6) – Williams likely won’t be back in Pittsburgh, despite filling in admirably for Le’Veon Bell the last couple seasons. All 6 of Williams’ 2016 TDs came from inside the red-zone, with 4 coming from inside the 10-yard-line, so he’s still efficient in closing out drives, but he’ll be 34 at the start of the season and will likely be just a backup somewhere.

Shaun Draughn (NYG, 6) – He may not have been the starter in San Fran, but he was a quality depth player, as he will be in New York behind Shane Vereen and Paul Perkins (and perhaps a rookie if the Giants decide to pursue another RB in the draft). Draughn scored all 6 of his TDs in the red-zone and should still get some chances in 2017, but he won’t be a major factor.

Damien Williams (Mia, 6) – Williams didn’t get many chances behind Jay Ajayi in 2016, and he’s basically taking a 3.4 YPC into a 2017 battle with Kenyan Drake for backup duties.

Theo Riddick (Det, 6) – Riddick is simply a perfect back for the Jim Bob Cooter offense, and it was on full display before Riddick went down with wrist injuries that cost him 6 fames of 2016. His role in the passing game can’t be overstated, as he can score from anywhere on the field. He underwent surgery in the offseason and might miss some offseason activities, but should be back as an excellent PPR option.

Derrick Henry (Ten, 5) – It’s likely that Henry’s role will increase in 2017, but he’s still well behind DeMarco Murray on the depth chart, so his ceiling is certainly capped. 4 of Henry’s 5 TDs came from inside the 10, so he should again have chances to finish off drives and give Murray a breather, but he’s still simply a complementary piece. It would take an injury to Murray for Henry to make a serious fantasy impact consistently.

Devontae Booker (Den, 5) – While many touted Booker as a championship-winner once starting RB CJ Anderson went down, it became clear quickly that Booker simply can’t handle full time duties. He did prove himself to be a worthwhile investment for fantasy owners, but he’ll begin 2017 well behind CJA on the depth chart and should likely be drafted simply for handcuff purposes.

Tim Hightower (SF, 5) – With Shaun Draughn in New York and injuries piling up for Carlos Hyde, the Niners invested in Tim Hightower, who’s coming off back to back impressive seasons for an almost 31-year-old. He’ll be Hyde’s back up to start the season, but considering Hyde’s history, Hightower should be in line for a number of starts at some point.

Spencer Ware (KC, 5) – In his first season as the true No. 1, Ware fared pretty well. He still clearly experienced some fatigue and wear-and-tear, as the second half of 2016 showed, scoring just 2 TDs during that period. Additionally, when he was a rotational piece in 2015, his YPC was over a yard better (5.6 compared to 4.3). The future of Jamaal Charles is up in the air, but no matter what happens, Ware should be locked in again for a large role.

Bilal Powell (NYJ, 5) – Once Matt Forte went down late in the season, Powell took over nicely, getting involved in both the ground and the passing game. We don’t think he’s capable of being a number 1 back, and it’s likely he’ll split time evenly with Forte in 2017, but Powell should still have plenty of chances to score. For what it’s worth, 4 of his 5 TDs came inside the red-zone with 1 score of 40+ yards.

Chris Thompson (Was, 5) – Active out of the backfield, Thompson was re-signed in the offseason and will again see plenty of receiving opportunities. It may not always translate to TDs, but he did have 3 TDs inside the 10 along with 2 TDs of 10-29 yards.

James White (NE, 5) – We love James White, but the New England backfield is a bit of a headache, with Dion Lewis also getting receiving opportunities, the acquisition of Rex Burkhead, and the future of LeGarrette Blount in the air. White can be explosive however, as he showcased in the postseason and during the regular season, and we love the chemistry he showed with Tom Brady. He has much more PPR value than standard league value.

Zach Zenner (Det, 4) – Zenner was the beneficiary of injuries to Theo Riddick, Ameer Abdullah, and rookie RB Dwayne Washington, and performed well in their stead. He’s sure to drop down the depth chart heading into 2017, unfortunately, as all the backs are healthy again. If anything, however, Zenner will be watched closely on the WW in case of injury.

Jeremy Langford (Chi, 4) – Despite opening 2016 as the lead back, underwhelming performances and an ankle injury left the door open for Jordan Howard, who took the reins and didn’t look back. Langford will open up the season as the number 2 back behind Howard and could see some complementary work, but it’s a longshot for him to produce for fantasy.

Rashad Jennings (NYG, 4) – He’s entering his age-32 season and coming off a rough one, in which he had a 3.3 YPC. It’s unlikely he returns to the Giants and will probably land somewhere as a complementary piece, far from being a fantasy asset.

Darren Sproles (Phi, 4) – Sproles will continue to have PPR value heading into 2017 and amazingly, his explosiveness hasn’t really worn off yet, scoring 2 TDs inside the red-zone, another one from 20-29 yards and another from 40+ yards out. He’s no workhorse and volume won’t work in his favor, but his athleticism will, so he’s always on the verge of a big play.

Jerick McKinnon (Min, 4) – It was a disappointing season for McKinnon, who failed to take advantage of Adrian Peterson’s absence, and now finds himself either next to, or (more likely) behind Latavius Murray on the depth chart.

Doug Martin (TB, 3) – Things have quickly taken a turn for the worst for Martin, who couldn’t stay healthy in 2016 and is now facing a four-game drug suspension to begin the 2017 season. The Bucs actually didn’t look too bad in Martin’s absence last year, though it was a bit of a piece-meal job. He’s still the most talented back on the roster, but it’s tough to be optimistic about his 2017 at this point.

Ty Montgomery (GB, 3) – Montgomery is explosive and efficient, both in the open field and in short-yardage situations. All 3 of his TDs in 2016 came inside the 10-yard line, but he should have a chance to up that total as the lead back in Green Bay. At the very worst, he’ll be part of a rotation with Christine Michael, now that Eddie Lacy is gone. There’s plenty to like about Montgomery going forward.

Chris Ivory (Jac, 3) – It was an ugly season all around for the Jags, and Ivory was no exception, scoring just 3 times, all from inside the 10-yard-line, and sustaining injuries. Still, it currently looks like both Ivory and Yeldon are the top-2 backs here, so there’s some fantasy value remaining, but we’re not holding our breath for a jump in production.

Kenneth Dixon (Bal, 3) – Dixon could’ve entered the 2017 season as the lead back in Baltimore, but he’s now facing a four-game suspension to start the season, opening the door for Terrance West. Additionally, Danny Woodhead figures to eat up plenty of the passing down opportunities, so Dixon is going to have to big a big splash quickly when he returns from suspension to have any chancee of improving on his 2016 TD total.

Jalen Richard (Oak, 3) – Both Richard and fellow rookie DeAndre Washington looked like a pretty effective duo when Latavius Murray went down with injury last season. Now, Murray is off to Minnesota, leaving Richard and Washington as the top two backs. Richard had more of an impact as a receiver, so he might get the edge, but either way, his TD total is sure to rise in 2017.

Charcandrick West (KC, 3) – West had a few starts when Spencer Ware was banged up, but won’t likely have enough of a role in 2017 to make any consistent impact.

Jacquizz Rodgers (TB, 2) – While Rodgers might technically be behind Doug Martin and Charles Sims on the depth chart, Martin is facing suspension, and Sims thrives when used primarily as a passing-down back, so Rodgers should have a role immediately in 2017.

DeAndre Washington (Oak, 2) – Both Washington and fellow rookie DeAndre Jalen Richard looked like a pretty effective duo when Latavius Murray went down with injury last season. Now, Murray is off to Minnesota, leaving Richard and Washington as the top two backs. Washington didn’t see as much work in the passing game, but looked more explosive at times, scoring both of his TDs form 20+ yards away.

Duke Johnson (Cle, 1) – More of a PPR option, Johnson’s ceiling is limited due to the volume that lead RB Isaiah Crowell receives on a regular basis. Johnson now has just 3 TDs in two years, so expectations should be kept in check.

Notable players not included due to lack of playing time: Cameron Artis-Payne, Alfred Morris, Shane Vereen, Justin Forsett, Alfred Blue, Jamaal Charles, Kyle Juszczyk, Dwayne Washington, Chris Johnson, Dwayne Washington, Danny Woodhead, Ameer Abdullah, Kapri Bibbs, Mike Tolbert, Lance Dunbar, CJ Prosise, TJ Yeldon, Charles Sims, Rex Burkhead, Thomas Rawls, Giovani Bernard, Travaris Cadet, John Kuhn, James Starks, Wendell Smallwood, CJ Anderson

 

Wide Receivers

Rank

Player

Team

0-9

10-19

20-29

30-39

40+

Total

1

Jordy Nelson

GB

9

2

2

1

0

14

2

Antonio Brown

Pit

3

1

6

2

0

12

3

Mike Evans

TB

5

2

3

1

1

12

4

Davante Adams

GB

5

2

4

0

1

12

5

Odell Beckham

NYG

4

1

1

1

3

10

6

Michael Thomas

NO

6

1

1

1

0

9

7

Rishard Matthews

Ten

5

2

1

1

0

9

8

Kenny Stills

Mia

1

0

3

1

4

9

9

Tyreek Hill

KC

3

1

0

3

2

9

10

Brandin Cooks

NE

2

1

0

1

4

8

11

Michael Crabtree

Oak

4

2

2

0

0

8

12

Dez Bryant

Dal

2

3

2

0

1

8

13

Sterling Shepard

NYG

4

2

1

1

0

8

14

Anquan Boldin

Det

4

2

1

1

0

8

15

Doug Baldwin

Sea

3

3

0

0

1

7

16

Tyrell Williams

LAC

2

0

2

0

3

7

17

Kelvin Benjamin

Car

3

2

1

0

1

7

18

Jamison Crowder

Was

1

2

1

1

2

7

19

Donte Moncrief

Ind

6

0

1

0

0

7

20

Taylor Gabriel

Atl

2

0

1

1

3

7

21

J.J. Nelson

Ari

3

1

0

0

3

7

22

Julio Jones

Atl

2

0

2

1

1

6

23

T.Y. Hilton

Ind

2

0

0

3

1

6

24

Larry Fitzgerald

Ari

4

0

2

0

0

6

25

Allen Robinson

Jac

4

2

0

0

0

6

26

Brandon LaFell

Cin

4

0

0

0

2

6

27

Demaryius Thomas

Den

3

1

0

0

1

5

28

Amari Cooper

Oak

0

0

0

4

1

5

29

Emmanuel Sanders

Den

3

0

0

1

1

5

30

Kenny Britt

Cle

3

1

1

0

0

5

31

Adam Thielen

Min

2

1

0

1

1

5

32

Cole Beasley

Dal

4

1

0

0

0

5

33

Michael Floyd

NE

4

1

0

0

0

5

34

Seth Roberts

Oak

2

2

0

0

1

5

35

Terrelle Pryor

Was

4

1

0

0

0

5

36

A.J. Green

Cin

1

1

0

0

2

4

37

Jarvis Landry

Mia

1

1

0

0

2

4

38

Golden Tate

Det

1

0

2

0

1

4

39

Cameron Meredith

Chi

0

1

1

1

1

4

40

Willie Snead

NO

3

1

0

0

0

4

41

Mike Wallace

Bal

1

1

0

0

2

4

42

DeAndre Hopkins

Hou

1

0

2

0

1

4

43

DeSean Jackson

TB

0

1

0

0

3

4

44

Marvin Jones

Det

2

0

0

1

1

4

45

Randall Cobb

GB

4

0

0

0

0

4

46

Quincy Enunwa

NYJ

1

0

2

0

1

4

47

DeVante Parker

Mia

2

0

1

0

1

4

48

Ted Ginn

NO

0

0

0

1

3

4

49

Dontrelle Inman

LAC

0

1

0

1

2

4

50

Mohamed Sanu

Atl

1

3

0

0

0

4

51

Travis Benjamin

LAC

1

1

0

0

2

4

52

Chris Hogan

NE

0

1

0

1

2

4

53

Terrance Williams

Dal

1

1

1

1

0

4

54

Malcolm Mitchell

NE

3

0

0

0

1

4

55

Danny Amendola

NE

2

2

0

0

0

4

56

Devin Funchess

Car

1

2

0

1

0

4

57

Justin Hardy

Atl

4

0

0

0

0

4

58

Justin Hunter

Pit

2

1

0

1

0

4

59

Tavon Austin

LAR

0

1

1

1

1

4

60

Stefon Diggs

Min

1

0

2

0

0

3

61

Julian Edelman

NE

1

1

0

0

1

3

62

Pierre Garcon

SF

0

1

1

0

1

3

63

Jordan Matthews

Phi

1

2

0

0

0

3

64

Marqise Lee

Jac

1

0

2

0

0

3

65

Brandon Marshall

NYG

1

2

0

0

0

3

66

Eli Rogers

Pit

2

0

1

0

0

3

67

Jeremy Kerley

SF

1

1

0

1

0

3

68

Corey Coleman

Cle

0

1

1

1

0

3

69

Allen Hurns

Jac

1

1

0

0

1

3

70

Kendall Wright

Chi

1

0

0

1

1

3

71

Brian Quick

Was

1

0

0

0

2

3

72

Breshad Perriman

Bal

0

1

1

0

1

3

73

Marquise Goodwin

SF

1

0

0

0

2

3

74

Torrey Smith

Phi

1

0

1

0

1

3

75

Andrew Hawkins

Cle

2

1

0

0

0

3

76

Brandon Coleman

NO

2

1

0

0

0

3

77

Brice Butler

Dal

1

0

2

0

0

3

78

Andre Holmes

Buf

3

0

0

0

0

3

79

Darrius Heyward-Bey

Pit

0

1

0

1

1

3

80

Albert Wilson

KC

1

0

1

0

1

3

81

Eric Decker

NYJ

1

1

0

0

0

2

82

Alshon Jeffery

Phi

1

1

0

0

0

2

83

Sammy Watkins

Buf

1

0

0

1

0

2

84

Eddie Royal

Chi

1

1

0

0

0

2

85

Jeremy Maclin

KC

0

2

0

0

0

2

86

Adam Humphries

TB

1

0

0

0

1

2

87

Will Fuller

Hou

1

1

0

0

0

2

88

John Brown

Ari

0

1

0

1

0

2

89

Robby Anderson

NYJ

0

0

0

0

2

2

90

Cordarrelle Patterson

Oak

1

1

0

0

0

2

91

Dorial Green-Beckham

Phi

2

0

0

0

0

2

92

Tajae Sharpe

Ten

0

0

0

2

0

2

93

Phillip Dorsett

Ind

0

0

0

0

2

2

94

Bryan Walters

Jac

1

1

0

0

0

2

95

Nelson Agholor

Phi

0

0

0

1

1

2

96

Sammie Coates

Pit

1

0

0

0

1

2

97

Russell Shepard

Car

0

2

0

0

0

2

98

Geronimo Allison

GB

1

1

0

0

0

2

99

Cobi Hamilton

Pit

0

0

2

0

0

2

100

Aldrick Robinson

SF

1

0

0

1

0

2

101

Jalin Marshall

NYJ

1

1

0

0

0

2

102

Deonte Thompson

Chi

2

0

0

0

0

2

103

Rod Streater

SF

1

1

0

0

0

2

104

Jordan Taylor

Den

1

1

0

0

0

2

105

Tanner McEvoy

Sea

0

0

1

0

1

2

106

Bennie Fowler

Den

1

0

0

0

1

2

107

Darren Waller

Bal

2

0

0

0

0

2

108

Roger Lewis

NYG

0

0

1

1

0

2

109

Andre Johnson

Ten

1

0

0

0

0

2

110

Tyler Lockett

Sea

0

0

0

0

2

2

111

Jeff Janis

GB

1

1

0

0

0

2

112

Marquess Wilson

Chi

1

0

0

0

0

1

113

Greg Salas

Buf

0

0

0

0

1

1

114

Robert Woods

LAR

1

0

0

0

0

1

115

DeMarcus Ayers

Pit

0

1

0

0

0

1

116

Tyler Boyd

Cin

1

0

0

0

0

1

117

Jaron Brown

Ari

0

0

0

0

1

1

118

Victor Cruz

NYG

1

0

0

0

0

1

119

Jermaine Kearse

Sea

1

0

0

0

0

1

120

Markus Wheaton

Pit

0

0

0

1

0

1

121

Kamar Aiken

Ind

1

0

0

0

0

1

122

Paul Richardson

Sea

1

0

0

0

0

1

123

Corey Brown

Buf

0

1

0

0

0

1

124

Jordan Norwood

Den

0

0

0

1

0

1

125

Josh Bellamy

Chi

0

1

0

0

0

1

126

Josh Huff

TB

1

0

0

0

0

1

127

Jarius Wright

Min

1

0

0

0

0

1

128

Freddie Martino

TB

0

0

0

0

1

1

129

Braxton Miller

Hou

0

1

0

0

0

1

130

Andre Roberts

Atl

1

0

0

0

0

1

131

Jeremy Ross

Ari

1

0

0

0

0

1

132

Brittan Golden

Ari

1

0

0

0

0

1

133

Arrelious Benn

Jac

0

0

0

0

1

1

134

Trevor Davis

GB

1

0

0

0

0

1

135

Leonte Carroo

Mia

0

1

0

0

0

1

136

Dwayne Harris

NYG

0

1

0

0

0

1

 

Jordy Nelson (GB, 14) – After a lost 2015 season, Nelson returned to the field with considerable force, leading all WRs with 14 TDs. He was back to being Rodgers’ most reliable weapon, scoring 9 times from inside the 10 yard line and an additional 5 times from outside the 10. More importantly, Nelson didn't let Davante Adam’s emergence hinder his scoring chances, even though Adams had 12 TD grabs of his own. Looking at 2017, we don’t anticipate much difference, though the addition of Martellus Bennett could take away some red-zone and goal-line looks from the rest of the weapons. It’s still a pass-first offense and Nelson is the top guy for the league’s [arguably] top passer.

Antonio Brown (Pit, 12) – Brown finished with 2 more TDs in 2016 than he did in 2015, and was ultimately a weapon for Big Ben all over the field, scoring the most TDs of all wideouts from 20-29 yards (6), and more TDs from 20+ yards than any other wideout (8). Brown did get plenty of red-zone and goal-line looks, but did most of his damage in the intermediate-deep game, burning CBs and Ss left and right. It was expected that Brown would see lots of vertical involvement since Martavis Bryant was suspended for all of 2016. Bryant will be back for 2017 and likely take away some of AB’s targets, but Brown is still one of the best, if not the best, WRs in the NFL and is capable of scoring on any play from anywhere on the field. Expect him to have another season of double-digit TDs.

It's possible his targets take a small hit with the signing of DeSean Jackson, but Mike Evans is an elite WR1 and will no doubt be in double-digits for 2017 TDs.Mike Evans (TB, 12) – Evans quadrupled his TD count from 2015 (3) to 2016, regaining his rookie-year form and morphing into a top-5 receiver. Jameis Winston didn’t have much to throw to outside of Evans, who scored from all over the field, including 5 TDs of 20+ yards and 2 TDs of 30+ yards. His big frame and physical play makes him an excellent red-zone threat, hence the 7 TDs from inside the 20, so the addition of DeSean Jackson won’t likely impact his numbers too much. We did see TE Cameron Brate emerge as a legitimate red-zone threat, but Evans is too good to NOT command targets in the red-zone.

Davante Adams (GB, 12) – The third year was the charm for Evans, who finished just 2 TD receptions behind teammate Jordy Nelson for the league lead. Frankly, Adams should’ve finished ahead, as he had a number of TD drops (two in one game late in the season), but his astronomical growth in 2016 is just fine for us. Adams will likely enter 2017 as Rodgers’ number 2 option in the passing game ahead of Randall Cobb, and his TD breakdown showed his capability of scoring from all over, tallying 7 TDs inside the red-zone and 5 outside the red-zone.

Odell Beckham (NYG, 10) – OBJ’s 10 TDs were a step back from his 13 in 2016, but there was no shortage of explosive plays, tallying 3 TDs of 40+ yards, as he excelled after the catch and was nearly unstoppable in the open field. To be honest, you could argue OBJ’s 2016 was more impressive than his 2015 considering the huge drop in production and efficiency from his QB. He’ll have to compete with Brandon Marshall for targets now in 2016, but Marshall knows he’s the No. 2 and OBJ is the leading man. He’ll have another season of double-digit TDs for sure.

Michael Thomas (NO, 9) – Michael Thomas turned into what HC Sean Payton had hoped Brandon Coleman would be—a reliable target with a big frame and decent speed. While technically the No. 2 behind Brandin Cooks, Thomas finished as a better fantasy WR and with more catches. Thomas was more effective closer to the goal-line, as 6 of his 9 TDs came from inside the 10, but he proved to be reliable all over. And now Cooks is gone, opening the door for Thomas to establish himself as the lead guy in NO and a bona-fide WR1.

Rishard Matthews (Ten, 9) – Matthews finished 24th in FPG in PPR, but comes towards the top of this list because of the rapport he developed with Marcus Mariota, scoring 5 TDs from inside the 10 and another 4 from outside the 10. Matthews wasn’t the most consistent fantasy producer to start the season, but turned it on in the second half. We love his versatility in this Tennessee offense, and while he may not be at the level of the OBJs and Antonio Browns of the world, he’s the clear-cut No. 1 option in the passing game.

Kenny Stills (Mia, 9) – Stills was re-signed by the Dolphins and for good reason. While teammate Jarvis Landry was racking up the receptions, Stills was racking up the TDs, leading the league in TDs from 40+ yards (tied with Brandin Cooks), and tallying 8 of his 9 TDs from 20+ yards. Stills won’t see the ball much once the offense enters the red-zone, especially since becoming run-centered around Jay Ajayi, but his big play ability can’t be overstated, especially in non-PPR leagues. Though the team added Julius Thomas in the offseason, we fully expect Ryan Tannehill to continue to take shots to Stills.

Hill has TD upside on both the receiving and rushing end, so while the volume may not be incredible, his big-play abilities makes up for it.Tyreek Hill (KC, 9) – Talk about explosive! One of Hill’s 2 TDs of 40+ yards was actually a rushing TD, as Hill was utilized excellently by the KC offense. It is quite glaring that he had just 1 TD inside the red-zone, as he’s much more an explosive player and vertical threat than he his a red-zone and goal-line target, but the great thing about Hill is that it only takes one play…at any moment. It’s tough to say whether he’ll reach 9 TDs again in 2017, but we at least know that Hill’s dual-threat ability gives him an edge over others.

Brandin Cooks (NE, 8) – Cooks was tied with Kenny Stills for the lead in TDs of 40+ yards (4), and it didn't take long for him to showcase his speed, scoring on a 98-yard reception in Week 1. He’s going from one future HOF QB to another, and while New England does have a lot of receiving options both at wideout and in the backfield, Cooks is too talented to NOT see multiple shots down the field.

Michael Crabtree (Oak, 8) – Crabtree followed up a 9-TD 2015 with an 8-TD 2016, often being a more reliable wideout than Amari Cooper. Crabtree scored 6 of his TDs inside of the red-zone, and while he’ll have some competition from newly acquired TE Jared Cook, a healthy Derek Carr should again mean plenty of targets to go around in this Oakland offense. We do have to be concerned with his drops (13, a league high), but the volume should remain.

Dez Bryant (Dal, 8) – Coming off a disappointing 2015, in which he had just 3 receiving TDs, Dez came back onto the scene with a new QB and still produced. Yes, the chemistry was visibly not as good than what he had with Tony Romo, but he’s still eons above the other options in the passing game, is still just 28, and with a decent breakdown in TD distance, there’s no reason to think that Dak Prescott won’t look his way at any given moment. He’s an elite WR1 option heading into 2017.

Sterling Shepard (NYG, 8) – Shepard’s fantasy production was very much TD-dependent, as he finished 44th among WRs in a PPR. So it was encouraging to see him reach 8 TDs in his rookie year playing opposite one of the best in the game during a down year for Eli Manning. However, Shepard’s now the number 3 behind OBJ and Brandon Marshall. Chances are he’s still receive a decent amount of looks inside the red-zone, as 6 of his 8 TDs came there, but the addition of Marshall really limits his value.

Anquan Boldin (Det, 8) – Boldin’s 8 TDs were his saving grace, as he finished 50th among WRs in a PPR with 10.8 FPG. At this point in his career, he’s a TD-dependent possession receiver, so it’s tough to imagine reaching 8 TDs again. He’s also entering his age-36 season. Depending on where he lands, he could replicate his decent success as a Lion, but we’re lowering our expectations.

Tyrell Williams (LAC, 7) – Williams was a favorite target of Philip Rivers from all over, scoring 4 TDs inside the 30 and 2 TDs of 40+ yards. He certainly benefited from the injury to Keenan Allen, but will still be the number 2 option in passing game once Allen returns in 2017. The TEs did eat up plenty of targets in the red-zone, and since Antonio Gates is returning, he and Hunter Henry will likely be primary targets near the goal-line, but Williams is established as a solid intermediate-deep threat.

Kelvin Benjamin (Car, 7) – We had high hopes for a Funchess-Benjamin receiving duo, only to be greatly disappointed. It wasn’t an ideal year coming off a torn ACL, but there’s still plenty to like about him, especially his size. 6 of his 7 TDs came inside the 30, while 5 came in the red-zone and 3 came inside the 10. TE Greg Olsen will continue to be a big factor in the passing game but we know Benjamin has talent and strength, so we’re still fairly optimistic for 2017.

Jamison Crowder (Was, 7) – Crowder was a mid-season stud in 2016, scoring 4 TDs in 5 weeks and vaulting himself from 2 TDs in 2015 to 7 in 2016. He can score from all over, tallying 3 TDs inside the red-zone and 4 from outside, including 2 from 40+ yards. DeSean Jackson is gone now, which will undoubtedly help Crowder, and considering the injuries piling up for Jordan Reed, Crowder is likely to be one of Kirk Cousins’ favorite targets.

Donte Moncrief (Ind, 7) – TD-dependent doesn’t even begin to describe Moncrief’s 2016 season, in which he finished with 307 receiving yards but still 7 TDs in just 9 games. He was Andrew Luck’s go-to man near the goal-line, as 6 of his 7 TDs came from inside the 10. While there’s no doubt TY Hilton is the primary option here in the passing game, Moncrief is still young, and his red-zone play won’t be overlooked, so there’s plenty to like heading into 2017, provided he stays healthy.

Taylor Gabriel (Atl, 7) – Gabriel had plenty of ups and downs in 2016 as the number 3, and sometimes number 4 option in the passing game. He did finish better than Mohamed Sanu with 10.8 FPG despite more than 20 fewer targets, but is tough to trust on a weekly basis. He’s a great big play threat, as 4 of his 7 TDs came from 30+ yards out, but it’s tough to count on him consistently.

JJ Nelson (Ari, 7) – Nelson was active both near the goal-line and from far out, as 3 of his TDs came from inside the 10 and another 3 came from 40+ yards out. He elevated himself to the number 2 receiver behind Larry Fitzgerald, though we’re hoping John Brown bounces back from an injury-plagued 2016. Nelson has the speed to score from all over, though it’s tough to say if he’ll reach 7 TDs again in 2017.

The 6 TDs in 2016 were a bit disappointing, but Jones remains an elite WR1 option for 2017.Julio Jones (Atl, 6) – It’s amazing to see Jones so “low” on this list, considering he was the number 6 WR for fantasy with 18.6 FPG in a PPR. During what was a memorable season for the Falcons and an excellent passing season for QB Matt Ryan, Jones did a lot of damage between the 20s, but had just 2 red-zone TDs. The Falcons have a stable of weapons between Mohamed Sanu, Taylor Gabriel, Devonta Freeman, Tevin Coleman and Austin Hooper, so it’s not entirely surprising Jones finished with just 6 TDs, especially since he was hampered by injury a few times. He underwent surgery in the offseason and could be limited to start training camp, but there’s little to worry about for this elite WR1. He’s Matty Ice’s number 1 option in the passing game, one of the best wideouts in the game and should still see plenty of targets all over.

TY Hilton (Ind, 6) – Hilton absolutely demolished his teammates in yards, though for the second straight season, he finished behind Donte Moncrief in TDs. It appears to be all Moncrief once the Colts hit the red-zone, but Hilton is Andrew Luck’s go-to option at all other moments. Four of Hilton’s six TDs came from 30+ yards out and he’ll continue to eat up the yards in 2017.

Larry Fitzgerald (Ari, 6) – Fitz went from 9 TDs in 2015 to 6 in 2016, but remains Carson Palmer’s most reliable receiver, especially close to the goal-line, as four of Fitz’s six TDs came from inside the 10. While the offense is certainly centered around David Johnson, Fitz will remain the top option in the passing game in 2017. There’s not much to say about him we don’t already know, and though he’s “faded” a bit the last couple years late in the season, he’ll still eat up targets.

Allen Robinson (Jac, 6) – We all know about the drop-off that was the Jacksonville offense last year. A-Rob went from 14 receiving TDs in 2015 to just 6 in 2016, all 6 coming inside the red-zone. We’ll point our fingers at Blake Bortles, but A-Rob is deserving of some blame as well. Still, he has a good chance to bounce back nicely, especially since he’s clearly a red-zone favorite of Bortles and remained the top option in the passing game, unlike Allen Hurns, who was passed for the number 2 spot by Marqise Lee. While A-Rob may not hit his 2015 numbers, expect him to at least improve on his disastrous 2016.

Brandon LaFell (Cin, 6) – With Mohamed Sanu and Marvin Jones gone, LaFell filled in nicely as the number 2 option behind AJ Green, and did step up down the stretch, taking advantage of Green’s injury. TE Tyler Eifert also could not sustain a full season either without injury, opening the door for LaFell, who scored 4 of his TDs inside the 10, but also had 2 TDs of 40+ yards. Green will be back and healthy, but Eifert cannot be counted on consistently, so expect LaFell to continue to see looks for Andy Dalton, especially in the red-zone.

Demaryius Thomas (Den, 5) – Both DT and Emmanuel Sanders weathered some mediocre QB play in 2016, and both totaled 5 TDs each on the season. They’ll again be co-1A options in the passing game, though we can’t expect much more than we what we saw unless we see improved QB play. For Thomas, he was more reliable in the red-zone, as 4 of his 5 TDs came inside the 20. We’ll probably see trade-offs again in 2017, based on matchup, so expect some down games from DT as well as some big plays.

Amari Cooper (Oak, 5) – Despite hitting 1,000 yards receiving, Cooper was ultimately a disappointment for fantasy in 2016, and was non-existent in the red-zone, with all 5 of his TDs coming from 30+ yards away. The good news is that he’s still extremely young, has a young gunslinger for a QB and is the top option in the passing game. The team will expect more from him in 2017, as they should, but we’d like to see him become a more consistent producer closer to the goal-line, especially with RB Latavius Murray gone.

Emmanuel Sanders (Den, 5) – Like his teammate Demaryius Thomas, Sanders finished with 5 TDs on the season and had plenty of ups and downs to go along with it. He did show off some big-play ability more than DT, but was also victim of some inconsistent QB play. There’s little doubt Sanders will be able to improve on his 2016 TD numbers if the QB play improves, and it was encouraging to see him remain a strong goal-line option, as 3 of his 5 TDs came from inside the 10.

Kenny Britt (Cle, 5) – Britt revived his career in 2016, improving on his 3-TD 2015 season, despite sub-par QB play. There are plenty of question marks in play now as he arrives in Cleveland, however. He’ll be fighting with Corey Coleman for top option in the passing game, and we still don’t know the Browns’ QB situation, so while we applaud Britt for revitalizing himself in 2016, we’re not holding our breath for a duplicate in 2017.

Adam Thielen (Min, 5) – Thielen was rewarded with a four-year contract and rightfully so: in a lackluster offense, Thielen clicked with QB Sam Bradford and even passed Stefon Diggs in receiving yards on the season. He was a threat from all over the field, scoring 2 TDs of 30+ yards and 3 TDs inside the red-zone. It’s possible the offense becomes more run-centric now with the arrival of Latavius Murray, and we’re still waiting for Laquon Treadwell to make an impact, but Thielen should enter the season as the number 2 passing option with plenty of chances to reach paydirt.

Cole Beasley (Dal, 5) – Beasley showed nice rapport with Dak Prescott in 2016, especially near the goal-line, as all 5 of his TDs came in the red-zone, 4 of them coming inside the 10-yard line. Dez Bryant is still the number 1 passing option, and Beasley is still more of a role player than a consistent fantasy wideout, but he at least showed his capability to finish off drives.

Michael Floyd (NE, 5) – We’ll see where Floyd lands, considering the Pats signed Brandin Cooks and have a plethora of weapons now. It’s a shame that Floyd’s off-field issues counteract his talent, as he now has four straight seasons of 5 TDs. All 5 of his 2016 TDs came inside the red-zone, so it’s possible he remains a role player with TD upside.

Seth Roberts (Oak, 5) – Roberts saw more red-zone looks than Amari Cooper, astonishingly, as 4 of Roberts’ 5 TDs came inside the 20, adding another TD of 40+ yards. He’s still the number 3 option in the passing game and can’t be trusted on a week to week basis, but we at least know who Derek Carr is looking to once they enter the red-zone.

Terrelle Pryor (Was, 5) – Pryor played with more QBs than he had TDs, so give him plenty of credit for hitting 5 TDs on the season with the Browns. He’s in a much better home now, and considering both DeSean Jackson and Pierre Garcon have left Washington, look for Pryor to command the targets. He scored all 5 of his TDs in 2016 in the red-zone, but he’s talented enough to score from all over, provided he has a competent QB…which he finally has now.

AJ Green (Cin, 4) – Green’s season was shortened by injury, hence the 4 TDs compared to 2015’s 10. But he was a stud when he was on the field, scoring 2 TDs inside the red-zone and 2 big play TDs. It looked like he was taking full advantage of the departures of Mohamed Sanu and Marvin Jones, so we’re expecting another elite season in 2017, as he’ll still be only 29 entering the season, and will be the top option in the passing game.

Jarvis Landry (Mia, 4) – Landry’s a PPR stud, but won’t rack up the TDs as much. He had 4 TDs in 2015, and another 4 in 2016, despite tallying 1,000+ yards in both seasons. He does have big play ability, as evidenced by his 2 TDs of 40+ yards, but he’s more likely to put up big fantasy numbers because of volume, and not scores. The Dolphins are also likely to lean heavily again on Jay Ajayi in 2017, and considering they brought in red-zone threat Julius Thomas, we’re not expecting Landry’s TD numbers to skyrocket.

Golden Tate (Det, 4) – While Marvin Jones fizzled out, Tate emerged as Matthew Stafford’s favorite target down the stretch in 2016; and we should see much of the same. We also should see an improved running game with a healthy Ameer Abdullah, but that doesn’t mean Tate’s volume will decrease, especially since he got it done from all over.

Cameron Meredith (Chi, 4) – Meredith was a bit of a fantasy revelation in 2016, even with a carousel of QBs, finding the end-zone from all distances. There’s some stability now, with Mike Glennon set to start for 2017, but we haven’t seen him play in awhile. Still, Meredith’s raw ability is automatic upside, and with Alshon Jeffery gone, the targets will be there for Meredith.

Willie Snead (NO, 4) – Snead scored all 4 of his TDs in 2016 inside the red-zone, as the big plays were mainly left for Brandin Cooks. Cooks is gone now, though the team did add Ted Ginn. Snead will be the number 2 option in the passing game behind Michael Thomas, and is one of the best intermediate receivers out there, so expect Drew Brees to look his way at all yard-marks.

Mike Wallace (Bal, 4) – It’s no surprise that 2 of Wallace’s 4 TDs came on big plays, as he was the key deep threat for Joe Flacco in the Raven offense. He did add 2 TDs inside the red-zone, and with Steve Smith and Kamar Aiken gone, he should enter 2017 as Flacco’s number 1 option in the passing game. He can still be a bit big-play dependent, but we can never count out a long TD for him.

DeAndre Hopkins (Hou, 4) – Hopkins saw major regression in nearly all statistical categories, thanks to some abysmal QB play by Brock Osweiler. Hopkins still, however, made his presence known from all distances, scoring on a big play and adding a goal-line TD. Right now, the Texans are banking on Tom Savage to start, and the two got acquainted late in the 2016 season. Hopkins is an excellent candidate to bounce back in 2017, and it’s likely he ups his TD production from 2016.

DeSean Jackson (TB, 4) – Jackson continued his career as a major vertical threat, scoring 3 of his 4 TDs from long distances. He’s in a new home now, and in a great spot opposite Mike Evans. While Evans will be the number 1 option, and TE Cameron Brate should command a lot of red-zone targets, we imagine Jameis Winston will have plenty of fun with Jackson running vertical routes, so expect some big plays from him in 2017.

Marvin Jones (Det, 4) – Jones started out 2016 hot, but became more of a role player for Matthew Stafford, as Golden Tate emerged as his favorite receiver. We should probably expect much of the same in 2017, especially if the running game can get going. Jones is still a good player, capable of scoring from all over, but he’s no lock to rack up 6, 7, 8+ TDs.

Randall Cobb (GB, 4) – It was a down year for Cobb, who fell down the totem pole behind Aaron Rodgers and Davante Adams. But Cobb still had value in the red-zone, scoring all 4 of his TDs inside the 10-yard line. He’s still young—he’ll be entering his age-27 season—but 2014 seems like an eternity ago. Additionally, the team added Martellus Bennett and Lance Kendricks, both of whom could steal some red-zone looks. It’s crunch time for Cobb now.

Quincy Enunwa (NYJ, 4) – Considering the QB play by Ryan Fitzpatrick, there’s a lot to like about Enunwa’s 2016 season. He found the end-zone from all distances, and with Brandon Marshall gone, his target-share figures to increase, hopefully leading to some more TDs.

DeVante Parker (Mia, 4) – Parker’s inconsistency was on display yet again in 2016, though he did show some flashes. Parker is a solid role player in this offense, but between the rushing of Jay Ajayi, the deep-play ability of Kenny Stills, and the target-hound Jarvis Landry, Parker might again fall short of expectations in 2017.

Ted Ginn (NO, 4) – Ginn finds himself as the deep-threat for Drew Brees now, after scoring all 4 of his TDs from 30+ yards, and 3 of them from 40+ yards. He won’t fully fill Brandin Cooks’ role, but he’s in a damn good position to stretch the field while opposing CBs try and deal with Michael Thomas and Willie Snead.

Dontrelle Inman (LAC, 4) – Inman is a good role player and his 4 TDs in 2016 are probably his limit, as Keenan Allen and Travis Benjamin both should be healthy in 2017…not to mention the emergence of Tyrell Williams.

Mohamed Sanu (Atl, 4) – Frankly, Sanu’s 2016 was a bit disappointing, as many expected him to benefit from all the coverage Julio Jones sees. It was still a big step up from his TD-less 2015, but the Falcons just have so many weapons, we can’t expect much more from Sanu.

Travis Benjamin (LAC, 4) – Benjamin was actually passed by Dontrelle Inman late in the season, as he dealt with injury and mistakes. If healthy, however, he should be a nice role player for Philip Rivers with some big play upside, but he’s down on the depth chart as of now.

Chris Hogan (NE, 4) – Hogan showed some real flashes on the Pats with Tom Brady, but volume was a concern, and will be again in 2017, especially with the arrival of Brandin Cooks. He has big play ability but his ceiling is certainly capped.

Terrance Williams (Dal, 4) – It looked like Cole Beasley established enough of a rapport with Dak Prescott to take away some volume from Terrance Williams, and while we like how T-Will can score from just about anywhere, his role is fairly limited in this offense.

Malcolm Mitchell (NE, 4) – There are a lot of mouths to feed in New England now, but Mitchell showed a lot of promise in 2016 as a rookie, scoring 3 of his 4 TDs from inside the 10. The passing game will likely go through Rob Gronkowski and Brandin Cooks, but when healthy, Mitchell is a pretty versatile guy and should still see an increase in production in 2017.

Devin Funchess (Car, 4) – It was another disappointing year for Funchess, though we’d consider his 4 TDs a success, considering he had just 371 yards receiving opposite Kelvin Benjamin. Much of the Panther offense was anemic at times, though Funchess did make himself useful in the red-zone, scoring 3 of his 4 TDs there. Still, we can’t expect too much heading into 2017.

Tavon Austin (LAR, 4) – I’ll try not to sound like a broken record here but…it was yet again another disappointing season for such an explosive player. Austin’s 4 TDs was just 1 fewer than in 2015, though one of them was a rushing. We’re not huge fans of Jared Goff so it’s tough to get excited about Austin, and there’s some new weapons in town, limiting his upside.

Stefon Diggs (Min, 3) – When Diggs is healthy, he’s a top-tier receiver. But injuries derailed an otherwise excellent start to 2016, and he finished with just 3 TDs and fewer yards than Adam Thielen. It was encouraging to see Sam Bradford operate effectively in Minnesota, and Diggs still is just 23 years old, so there’s plenty to be excited about, but we can’t sugarcoat the fact that the Viking offense isn’t exactly fantasy-friendly.

Julian Edelman (NE, 3) – Edelman racked up the yards (a career high 1106), but the TDs simply didn’t come. His 3 TDs were 4 fewer than in 2015, and we have to be concerned about the arrival of Brandin Cooks heading into 2017, but we can’t overlook his history with Tom Brady and the fact that he can score from anywhere, tallying 2 TDs inside the red-zone and 1 of 40+ yards in 2016.

Pierre Garcon (SF, 3) – Garcon revitalized his career in 2016 and now finds himself as top-dog in San Francisco with a new coach in Kyle Shanahan. It’s not the greatest QB situation, but the volume should be there and his chances for finding paydirt should increase. Frankly, we wouldn’t be surprised to see Garcon to finish as a top-20 receiver in 2017.

Jordan Matthews (Phi, 3) – After back-to-back 8-TD seasons, Matthews saw a career low in yards and TDs, frustrating fantasy owners everywhere, despite having the No. 2 overall pick, Carson Wentz, at the helm. He now goes from being the number 1 receiver to perhaps the number 3, as Alshon Jeffery and Torrey Smith are in town. It also looked like Wentz was developing serious chemistry with Zach Ertz down the stretch. Perhaps Matthews is best served as a secondary, or tertiary option. And at the very least, expectations have been lowered severely.

Marqise Lee (Jac, 3) – Lee passed Allen Hurns on the depth chart as the number 2 receiver in 2016 and was able to stay healthy, so we like his chances in 2017, provided the offense takes a step forward. He’s a great possession receiver with immense YAC potential…he just needs the volume to make a real impact.

Brandon Marshall (NYG, 3) – Poor Marshall was the victim of Ryan Fitzpatrick play. A year after leading all receivers with 14 TDs in 2015, he managed just 3 in 2016. He’s now the number 2 option on the Giants behind Odell Beckham, and feels just fine with that. The weapons are there, now we just have to hope Manning takes a step forward from a down 2016.

Eli Rogers (Pit, 3) – We liked Rogers as one of the more efficient slot receivers in the league, and he showed well coming off a lost rookie season. He’ll again be their main slot guy with some TD-upside in the red-zone (2 of his 3 TDs came from inside the 10), but we do have to scale back expectations a little bit with the return of Martavis Bryant, effectively putting Rogers as the third option in the passing game…perhaps fourth, if you count Le’Veon Bell.

Jeremy Kerley (SF, 3) – Kerley had his best season since 2012 amid a horrid QB situation. Looking at 2017, he’ll be the number 2 option likely behind Pierre Garcon, but we can’t expect much more than a handful of TDs.

Allen Hurns (Jac, 3) – Hurns dealt with injury and mistakes for all of 2016, causing him to drop dramatically from 10 TDs in 2015 to just 3 in 2016. He’ll enter 2017 as the number 3 receiver behind Allen Robinson and Marqise Lee, so it’s tough to be optimistic.

Brian Quick (Was, 3) – Though the numbers weren’t extraordinary, Quick had his best career season in 2016, and now finds himself with a much better QB situation and lots of possibilities. The deep-threat scored 2 of his 3 TDs from 40+ yards away, and it probably won’t take long for Kirk Cousins to test his new vertical threat, especially with DeSean Jackson now in Tampa Bay.

Breshad Perriman (Bal, 3) – The chances will increase for Perriman with Steve Smith and Kamar Aiken gone in 2017. Perriman didn’t have an explosive 2016, but showed encouraging signs as an effective intermediate receiver with big catch ability. Look for Flacco to go to Perriman more often and for his numbers to increase.

Marquise Goodwin (SF, 3) – We’re excited to see what Goodwin can do under Kyle Shanahan, as Goodwin has never really been utilized to his fullest potential. A speedster Olympian, Goodwin was the recipient of plenty of Tyrod Taylor deep balls in 2016, catching 2 of his 3 TD passes from 40+ yards.

Torrey Smith (Phi, 3) – Following some seriously disappointing seasons lately in San Fran, Smith finds himself with a legit shot to make an impact alongside fellow recent acquisition Alshon Jeffery and the underwhelming Jordan Matthews. It’s unlikely Smith blows everyone away, even with an upgrade at QB, but the volume could be enough to add to his 2016 TD total

Brice Butler (Dal, 3) – Butler is buried behind Dez Bryant, Cole Beasley and Terrance Williams on the depth chart, but he still showed some flash with Dak Prescott. Beasley and Williams haven’t done anything extraordinary also, so it’s not out of the question Butler sees a bigger role.

Albert Wilson (KC, 3) – Not much to see here, folks. Wilson has some big-play ability, but he’s an afterthought in an offense centered around the running game, Travis Kelce, and now Tyreek Hill. Don’t expect Wilson to increase his TD total in 2017.

Alshon Jeffery (Phi, 2) – Thanks to injury and some poor QB play, Jeffery has just 6 total TDs in his last 2 seasons after totaling 10 in 2014. Now, he has a shot to regain 2014 form as the number 1 receiver for a rising star in Carson Wentz. He also signed a prove-it deal and has a lot to play for, especially with so much pessimism surrounding the end of his 2016 season because of PED suspension. His TD total will no doubt skyrocket based solely on volume increase, as long as he can stay on the field.

Jeremy Maclin (KC, 2) – After back-to-back 1,000+ yard seasons and 18 total TDs, Maclin’s 2016 was one to forget, totaling just 2 TDs, both of which came inside the red-zone. He’ll try to regain some Philly form, but it’ll be tough with Travis Kelce and Tyreek Hill commanding plenty of attention from Alex Smith. Maclin is still fairly young—he’ll be entering his age-29 season—but has turned into more a complementary player than a centerpiece.

Adam Humphries (TB, 2) – Humphries will remain the slot receiver in Tampa Bay after an encouraging 2016, though there may not be much room for improvement, considering the acquisition of DeSean Jackson and the red-zone emergence of Cameron Brate.

Will Fuller (Hou, 2) – Fuller had a promising start to his rookie campaign, but faded fast and hard. Thank goodness Brock Osweiler is out of the picture, but Fuller is likely to be a volatile player yet again and will have to compete with Braxton Miller as the number 2 wideout behind DeAndre Hopkins.

Tyler Lockett (Sea, 2) – Lockett hasn’t been proven to be anything other than a deep-threat, as both of his 2016 TDs came from 40+ yards out. He is apparently expected to be ready for Week 1 of 2017 after breaking his leg late last year, but he’s simply not a consistent fantasy option.

Robert Woods (LAR, 1) – Woods is in a pretty good spot now, as it’s likely new HC Sean McVay goes with a pass-heavy attack. We’re not necessarily holding our breath for Woods, whose QB has plenty of question marks to go along with him, but Woods will have every shot to be Jared Goff’s number 1 option. Expect his TD total to increase.

Tyler Boyd (Cin, 1) – Though Brandon LaFell was re-signed and AJ Green will be healthy for 2017, Boyd should have plenty of chances to see an increase in volume and TDs. He was primarily a complementary player in 2016, but is too talented to stay that way.

Victor Cruz (NYG, 1) – We’ll see where Cruz lands, as the Giants apparently aren’t interested in re-signing him…and for good reason. With just 1 TD to his name in 2016, he has 3 total since 2014, and won’t likely be asked to be a number 1 or number 2 guy anywhere this coming season.

Kamar Aiken (Ind, 1) – A year after flirting with 1,000 yards and totaling 5 TDs in 2015, Aiken found himself in a muddled 2016 Raven receiving corps. Now, he’ll have a shot to beat out Phillip Dorsett for the number 3 WR spot in Indy. If he does, we can’t help but think his numbers will increase.

Notable players not included due to lack of playing time: Eric Decker, Sammy Watkins, Jaron Brown, Braxton Miller, Danny Amendola, Justin Hunter, Justin Hardy, Jermaine Kearse, Markus Wheaton, Sammie Coates, John Brown, Eddie Royal, Darrius Heyward-Bey, Brandon Coleman, Andrew Hawkins, Corey Coleman, Kendall Wright, Andre Holmes, Cordarrelle Patterson, Marquess Wilson

 

Tight Ends

Rank

Player

Team

0-9

10-19

20-29

30-39

40+

Total

1

Cameron Brate

TB

4

4

0

0

0

8

2

Hunter Henry

LAC

5

2

1

0

0

8

3

Kyle Rudolph

Min

4

1

2

0

0

7

4

Delanie Walker

Ten

3

2

1

1

0

7

5

Antonio Gates

LAC

5

2

0

0

0

7

6

Martellus Bennett

GB

4

1

1

1

0

7

7

Jordan Reed

Was

5

0

1

0

0

6

8

Jimmy Graham

Sea

1

3

0

2

0

6

9

Dwayne Allen

NE

2

2

2

0

0

6

10

Tyler Eifert

Cin

2

3

0

0

0

5

11

Jack Doyle

Ind

3

1

1

0

0

5

12

Travis Kelce

KC

1

2

0

0

1

4

13

Zach Ertz

Phi

2

1

1

0

0

4

14

Zach Miller

Chi

3

1

0

0

0

4

15

C.J. Fiedorowicz

Hou

2

1

1

0

0

4

16

Julius Thomas

Mia

2

1

1

0

0

4

17

Charles Clay

Buf

1

2

0

0

1

4

18

Vance McDonald

SF

1

1

0

0

2

4

19

Dion Sims

Chi

3

1

0

0

0

4

20

Coby Fleener

NO

3

0

0

0

1

4

21

Greg Olsen

Car

1

1

0

0

1

3

22

Rob Gronkowski

NE

1

0

0

1

1

3

23

Jason Witten

Dal

1

1

1

0

0

3

24

Jacob Tamme

Atl

1

2

0

0

0

3

25

Clive Walford

Oak

1

1

0

1

0

3

26

Jesse James

Pit

3

0

0

0

0

3

27

Garrett Celek

SF

2

1

0

0

0

3

28

Austin Hooper

Atl

2

0

0

0

1

3

29

Dennis Pitta

Bal

1

1

0

0

0

2

30

Gary Barnidge

Cle

1

1

0

0

0

2

31

Vernon Davis

Was

0

1

0

1

0

2

32

Lance Kendricks

GB

0

2

0

0

0

2

33

Ryan Griffin

Hou

2

0

0

0

0

2

34

Jermaine Gresham

Ari

1

0

1

0

0

2

35

Richard Rodgers

GB

1

1

0

0

0

2

36

Luke Willson

Sea

1

1

0

0

0

2

37

Seth Devalve

Cle

0

1

1

0

0

2

38

Levine Toilolo

Atl

0

0

0

1

1

2

39

Xavier Grimble

Pit

0

0

2

0

0

2

40

Anthony Fasano

Mia

1

1

0

0

0

2

41

Eric Ebron

Det

2

0

0

0

0

2

42

Ladarius Green

Pit

0

0

1

0

0

1

43

Jared Cook

Oak

1

0

0

0

0

1

44

D.J. Tialavea

Atl

1

0

0

0

0

1

45

C.J. Uzomah

Cin

1

0

0

0

0

1

46

Jordan Cameron

Mia

0

1

0

0

0

1

47

Will Tye

NYG

1

0

0

0

0

1

48

Trey Burton

Phi

1

0

0

0

0

1

49

Virgil Green

Den

1

0

0

0

0

1

50

Marcedes Lewis

Jac

1

0

0

0

0

1

51

Daniel Brown

Chi

1

0

0

0

0

1

52

Austin Seferian-Jenkins

NYJ

0

0

0

1

0

1

53

Josh Hill

NO

1

0

0

0

0

1

54

Mychal Rivera

Oak

1

0

0

0

0

1

55

Ben Koyack

Jac

0

1

0

0

0

1

56

Erik Swoope

Det

0

0

1

0

0

1

57

Crockett Gillmore

Bal

1

0

0

0

0

1

58

Connor Hamlett

Cle

0

1

0

0

0

1

59

Jerell Adams

NYG

0

1

0

0

0

1

60

Darren Fells

Det

0

0

1

0

0

1

61

Larry Donnell

NYG

0

1

0

0

0

1

62

Stephen Anderson

Hou

1

0

0

0

0

1

63

Demetrius Harris

KC

1

0

0

0

0

1

64

Dominique Jones

Mia

1

0

0

0

0

1

65

Matt Lengel

NE

0

1

0

0

0

1

66

Ed Dickson

Car

1

0

0

0

0

1

67

Josh Perkins

Atl

0

0

1

0

0

1

68

Tyler Higbee

LAR

1

0

0

0

0

1

69

John Phillips

Den

1

0

0

0

0

1

70

Brandon Myers

TB

1

0

0

0

0

1

71

Gavin Escobar

Dal

1

0

0

0

0

1

72

Rhett Ellison

Min

1

0

0

0

0

1

 

Cameron Brate (TB, 8) – No knock on Brate, who was a revelation in 2016, but it’s amazing that he finished tied at the top of this list with 8 TDs. It was a rather down year for TEs, with Rob Gronkowski and Jordan Reed both dealing with significant injuries throughout. While other wideouts not named Mike Evans proved to be inconsistent and disappointing for Jameis Winston, Brate was a consistent producer in the red-zone, as all 8 of his TDs came from inside the 20. We don’t see that changing in 2017, as the addition of DeSean Jackson will likely impact the Bucs’ vertical game much more than their passing game in close quarters. Brate might not be one of the first 5 TEs taken in drafts, but there are few who can measure up when it comes to goal-line chances.

Primed for a breakout second season, we love the TD upside for Hunter Henry, who should see plenty of red-zone looks in 2017.Hunter Henry (LAC, 8) – Henry was absolute TD machine in 2016. More specifically, he was a red-zone TD machine, catching 7 of his 8 TDs from inside the 20. Henry dealt with the injury bug a bit, and the presence of Antonio Gates limited his upside a bit, but Henry is on the fast-track to being a year-in, year-out fantasy TE stud. He showed excellent chemistry with Philip Rivers, still caught TDs with Gates on the field, and Rivers seemed to look at him over wideouts Tyrell Williams, Travis Benjamin and Dontrelle Inman in close quarters. Keenan Allen will be healthy in 2017, which is another mouth to feed, and Antonio Gates is returning for another year, so we have to temper expectations for Henry, but he’s locked in as a top-tier TE.

Kyle Rudolph (Min, 7) – Rudolph had a breakout season in 2016 with QB Sam Bradford, catching 5 of his 7 TDs inside the red-zone to go alone with 2 TDs of 20-29 yards. Rudolph proved to be a valuable commodity in an otherwise weak year for TEs, and stood out while Stefon Diggs suffered injury and Adam Thielen tried to find consistency. While the team may try to get their running game going a bit with the arrival of Latavius Murray, Rudolph should again be a TE1.

Delanie Walker (Ten, 7) – Walker had his fewest yards since 2013 but still managed a career-high 7 TDs, as Kendall Wright was injured and the rest of the receiving corps were rather inconsistent at times. Walker is a TE who can score from all over, as evidenced by his 2 TDs of 20+ yards, and he should again be a TE1 in 2017, though he’s entering his age-33 season and the clock is ticking.

Antonio Gates (Lac, 7) – Frankly, it’s a bit annoying that Gates is returning for yet another season, as his presence could cap Hunter Henry’s upside a tad. We still think Henry is set for a breakout season, but Gates, who scored all 7 of his TDs in the red-zone, could steal some goal-line looks from the youngster. Gates doesn’t carry TE1 value anymore.

Martellus Bennett (GB, 7) – There was no room for Bennett once the Pats acquired Dwayne Allen. Bennett will now compete for targets with Lance Kendricks at the TE spot, but we give the advantage to Bennett. With Tom Brady, he had 4 TDs inside the 10-yard-line, and another 3 from 10-39 yards out. He’s just transferring from one future HOFer to another now, as he’ll have Aaron Rodgers throwing it to him. The only issue is that he’ll be sharing the field with Jordy Nelson, Davante Adams and Randall Cobb.

The pure definition of high risk/high reward, Reed is oft-injured, but still has just as good of a shot as any to increase his TD total.Jordan Reed (Was, 6) – While there’s plenty of risk in Reed, who has yet to play a full season in his career, HC Jay Gruden said in late March that the “offense runs through” Reed, according to CSN Mid-Atlantic. Reed went from 11 TDs in 2015 to just 6 in 2016, but he remains an elite TE1. 5 of his 6 scores came from inside the 10, so he knows how to get it done, as the Redskins have a plethora of other weapons to move the chains. They lost DeSean Jackson and Pierre Garcon but did add Brian Quick and Terrelle Pryor.

Jimmy Graham (Sea, 6) – Graham led all TEs in scores from outside the 10-yard line with 5. Unlike other top TEs, who found the end-zone close to the goal-line, Graham’s athleticism allows him to score from all over. He’s Russell Wilson’s 2nd favorite target in the passing game behind Doug Baldwin, so while we expect the team to become much more run-oriented with Eddie Lacy, Graham should again have TE1 potential.

Dwayne Allen (NE, 6) – Allen got outplayed last season at times by Jack Doyle, and he now finds himself alongside Rob Gronkowski. Allen caught 4 of his 6 TDs inside the red-zone, and we saw last year with Martellus Bennett that there’s still value in a TE not named Gronk, but Allen would have immense upside if Gronk can’t stay healthy.

Tyler Eifert (Cin, 5) – Eifert has now played a total of 22 games over the last three seasons…not great. When healthy, he’s one of the most talented TEs in the league, especially in the red-zone, where he caught all 5 of his TDs in 2016. But he’s a proven injury risk. He’ll be a TE1 next year if he stays on the field, but it’s a big “if” at this point.

Jack Doyle (Ind, 5) – With Dwayne Allen gone, it’s the Jack Doyle show now in Indy at TE. Doyle outplayed Allen often last season, becoming the second-best receiver on the team after TY Hilton and ahead of Donte Moncrief and Phillip Dorsett. He caught 3 of his TDs inside the 10-yard line, and considering the iffy state of the Colts’ run game, he should be in line for more goal-line targets. Doyle should be a solid TE2 right now with upside, and has a great chance to increase his TD total in 2017.

Kelce heads into 2017 as a top-2 TE option, so expect his TD number to rise.Travis Kelce (KC, 4) – Kelce has arguably passed Rob Gronkowski for the best TE in football, and he was best fantasy TE in total points…only 2nd to Jordan Reed in FPG in a PPR. However, Kelce’s TEs weren’t up to par with the elite guys, as his value over the second half of the season was based mainly on targets, receptions and yards. He recently underwent shoulder surgery but is apparently on track for training camp, so if all goes well, he should return for an even better 2017, bumping up his TD total.

Zach Ertz (Phi, 4) – Ertz was rookie QB Carson Wentz’s most reliable option in the passing game down the stretch, but unfortunately, Ertz has never totaled more than 4 TDs in a season in his career. All 4 of his TDs came from inside the red-zone, as it became clear Ertz would not drop passes like Jordan Matthews did. He’ll have more competition for targets and receptions now with Alshon Jeffery and Torrey Smith, but we think Ertz remains a top option down in the red-zone.

CJ Fiedorowicz (Hou, 4) – CJF had a breakout season of his own in 2016, despite the horrid play at QB and fellow TE Ryan Griffin eating some targets. He’s a great possession receiver and it was happy to see him acquainted with Tom Savage late in the season, but we’d think DeAndre Hopkins or Will Fuller takes a step forward in the TD department before CFJ does in 2017.

Julius Thomas (Mia, 4) – The TE position in Miami was pretty ugly last season, so we’re excited to see HC Adam Gase acquire Thomas. Thomas is an injury risk and his current play is a far-cry from 2013 and 2014, during which he had 12 TDs each as the member of the Broncos. But he should be a nice red-zone option for Ryan Tannehill, as 3 of Thomas’ 4 TDs came inside the 20.

Charles Clay (Buf, 4) – Yes, Clay had one long TD in 2016. But he’s merely a checkdown option for Tyrod Taylor and has simply proven he can’t be consistent. He can sometimes be more than simple a red-zone target, as he’s sort of an H-back type player, but we’re done putting faith in Clay, who won’t be anything more than a TE2 likely in 2017.

Vance McDonald (SF, 4) – McDonald scored in the first two games of 2016 but then not again until Week 9. We love his athleticism and has the potential to hold TE1 value. He led all TEs with 2 TDs of 40+ yards, as he can be just as explosive as a WR at times. We’re not loving the QB situation in San Fran, but we do like the coaching change, so if McDonald can stay healthy in 2017, he has a good shot to up his TD production.

Dion Sims (Chi, 4) – Sims is primarily a blocking TE, coming off a very disappointing season which, frankly, we can’t believe he managed 4 TDs. He’s behind Zach Miller on the depth chart and holds little value all around.

Coby Fleener (NO, 4) – Because of his QB, Fleener again has TE1 potential. But he’s the third option in the passing attack behind Michael Thomas and Willie Snead. Fleener scored 3 of his 4 TDs from inside the 10, and did have one huge play (and believe or not, a rushing TD), but he’s hard to trust heading into 2017. If anything, however, we’ll be optimistic about the fact he has another year with Brees under his belt. Don’t count on another rushing TD, though!

Greg Olsen (Car, 3) – Olsen reached 1,000 yards receiving for the third straight season, but his 3 TDs were unfortunately the second lowest of his career, and the lowest since his rookie year in 2007. He did prove more reliable than both Kelvin Benjamin and Devin Funchess, and should again be Cam Newton’s go-to man. While he is getting up there in age, Olsen has a great shot to increase his TD production in 2017 and finish again as a TE1.

Rob Gronkowski (NE, 3) – Gronkowski should really be in the “notable players excluded because of lack of playing time” list below all these write-ups, but he gets an exception because he’s Gronk. Yes, he had just 3 TDs, but it came in 8 games of play. And two of those games he was being closely monitored. Obviously, it’s a huge step back from 2015, in which he scored 11 TDs, but he’s expected to be healthy and ready for 2017 and will no doubt increase his TD total. There will be some competition, especially since the team acquired Brandin Cooks, but Gronk is Brady’s man, and he’s capable of scoring from all distances.

Jason Witten (Dal, 3) – This could be Witten’s final year coming up, as he’s going on 35 years old, has sometime missed just one game in his entire career despite taking a beating, and has steadily declined in production the last five seasons. We love Witten because he’s tough, and he’s still the top TE in Dallas now, but we can’t see him grabbing more than 5 or 6 TDs in 2017.

Jacob Tamme (Atl, 3) – Tamme’s a good TE, but not a good fantasy TE, totaling just 3 TDs in 8 games in 2016. It’s time for Austin Hooper to assume the role of starting TE for the Falcons now.

Clive Walford (Oak, 3) – The Raiders brought in Jared Cook so it doesn’t look good for Walford, who has 6 total TDs in two years of play. With Amari Cooper and Michael Crabtree already dominating the targets, Walford is unlikely to see an uptick in TD chances.

Jesse James (Pit, 3) – James was supposed to have a bigger role once news came out of Ladarius Green’s headaches, but it simply never happened. We like James, and apparently the coaching staff and Ben Roethlisberger do as well, but the 3 TDs he scored in 2016 might be a good barometer of what to expect in 2017, as Martavis Bryant will return, and Green is still on the roster.

Garrett Celek (SF, 3) – There’s little value for Celek once Vance McDonald returns from injury in 2017. The team also did add Pierre Garcon and Marquise Goodwin in the offseason, so we don’t see Celek tallying more than another 3 or 4 TDs, barring another injury to McDonald.

Austin Hooper (Atl, 3) – Hooper is the TE of the future for the Falcons and while he did get off to a relatively slow start, he showed big play potential, scoring one of his 3 TDs from 40+ yards out. TE Levine Toilolo was re-signed, but the team moved on from Jacob Tamme, so Hooper—who probably has a better shot of increasing his TD total than WR Mohamed Sanu—should be in line for a big leap in 2017.

Dennis Pitta (Bal, 2) – The Ravens still have Ben Watson, Crockett Gillmore, and Maxx Williams on the roster at TE, so considering Pitta did very little in the red-zone as a TE aside from his 2 TDs, we’re not expecting to see much more from him. He did at one point look to have some PPR value in 2016, but then fizzled out.

Gary Barnidge (Cle, 2) – Yeesh! Falling from 9 TDs in 2015 to just 2 in 2016, Barnidge predictably took a step back, but it was a bit more than we expected. The QB play didn’t help at all, and HC Hue Jackson said the team needs more out of the TE position. Whether that means they’ll draft a TE in the first round or bring in someone else, Barnidge’s window of fantasy relevance might have closed as suddenly as it opened.

Vernon Davis (Was, 2) – Davis was a great backup to Jordan Reed, and will return in 2017 again as his backup, a crucial role considering Reed’s injury history. Davis still has some juice in him, scoring from over 30 yards out and inside the red-zone, but he’ll need an injury to Jordan Reed to have some weekly fantasy relevance.

Lance Kendricks (GB, 2) – Kendricks’ 499 receiving yards last year were actually the second most in his career, but he’s unfortunately now on a team that will likely ask him to block and play in 2-TE sets, as Rodgers has a list of weapons he’d use before targeting Kendricks. It’s safe to say Kendricks won’t find paydirt more than a few times in 2017.

Jermaine Gresham (Ari, 2) – Make no mistake about it, Gresham is a big target with good hands in the red-zone, and we wouldn’t be surprised to see him increase his stats in 2017, considering the team just re-signed him. He’s not the first or second option in the passing game, but we’ll see if Carson Palmer looks his way in tight quarters.

Eric Ebron (Det, 2) – The Lions added Darren Fells to their roster for some competition, but it’s a longshot that he’d pass Ebron on the depth chart, despite all of Ebron’s inconsistencies. 1 of his 2 TDs in 2016 was actually a rushing TD, and he scored both from inside the 10. He’ll have his days and will flirt with TE1 status at times, but isn’t a favorite of ours.

Jared Cook (Oak, 1) – While Derek Carr already has Michael Crabtree and Amari Cooper at his disposal, there’s still a good shot Cook turns into a pass-catching asset for Carr. He’s no doubt in front of Clive Walford on the depth chart and should easily surpass his grand total of 1 TD from 2016.

Tyler Higbee (LAR, 1) – Higbee is a favorite of our own John Hansen’s, so we gotta give him some love, despite the slow rookie year. Much of the Rams offense was forgettable so Higbee gets a pass, and has already drawn praise from new HC Sean McVay. The team also released Lance Kendricks in the offseason, so Higbee’s ceiling is pretty high. Expect plenty more from him in 2017…we just hope Jared Goff takes a step forward as well.

Notable players not included due to lack of playing time: Richard Rodgers, Luke Willson, Levine Toilolo, Ladarius Green, Anthony Fasano, Trey Burton, Marcedes Lewis, Daniel Brown, Crockett Gillmore, Darren Fells, Larry Donnell, Will Tye, Jordan Cameron, Ryan Griffin